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THE CITY OF FRIENDLY ENTERPRISE 





Appliance Control Department 
MORRISON, ILL. 

General Electric Keeps Trying To Make Jobs Better — 
Job Improvment Program 

Good Pay • Fair Promotional Practices 

Good Working Conditions • Respectful Treatment 
Job Security • Full Information 

Good Bosses • Belief in JoUs Importance 

# Job Satisfaction 

PROGRESS IS OUR MOST IMPORTANT PRODUCT 




GENERAiaELECTRIC 



n \ 



1 1855 



SAUK VALLEY CC LIBRARY 



3 1516 00016 3277 



MORRISO]\ 1955 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 



MAY 29,30,31 



JUNE 1,2,3,4-1955 



IN 



THE CITY OF FRIENDLY ENTERPRISEP' 



LI 



THE 



CENTENNIAL CORPORATION OF MORRISON 



PRESENTS 



The Mammoth Historical Spectacle 



yPOfl lilESE PRAIRIES 



M 



JUNE 1,2,3,4-1955 



8:15 P.M. 



PARADES 



EXHIBITS 



^^K^'i'ALLEY COLLEGE 
LRC 0J2502 

AMUSEMENTS 






\OW A niLTO\ HOTEL 



THE 



ok 




The Xew Yorker, now a HillDii Hotel, is takinji 

progressive steps to make your conventions more 

successfnl. Many improvements are underway 

including: thorough refurbishing of public rooms. 

dictaphone service with facilities for mailing records. 

special floors for exclusive occupancy of women 

guests and installation of air-conditioning to more 

and more guest rooms. Along with these improved 

facilities, you'll find the high Hilton standard of 

service and hospitality will make your New Yorker 

conventions more efficient and effective. 



FOR RE.SERVATIOiVSi 



Inter-Hotel Re 



at any Hilton Hotel. 



Fnr r( 
Tr/rh 



THE NEW YORKER OFFERS g 

l.ncalion near city's important trading and 

(•nlriUiinmenl area. 

2.')llll ciiitside rooms with comfnrtadle 

ill rommiidations— many witl'. TV. 

I- iiu' dining facilities, pxcellent food. Famous 

Irrraci' Room ice Sliow. 

Fully iqirpped air-conditioned conference moms— 

blnepr-iU;:, on request. 

Ballroorii and Showroom layouts exactly as you 

3perify. 

Professional help on convention adveilising. 

promotion and entertainment. 

Convention manager and staff at disposal of 

association secretary. 

nvenlinn in formation write, phone LOnparrr 3-1000 ( 
,„• (\y l-l-'.H4i Diiane W . Carlton. Dirrrtnr ,,l Sale 



HOTEL 



/VW\//e4i' 



e'v^ 



^^fci^NOW A HII.T 



NOW A HILTON HOTEt. 



NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS -- THANK YOU. 

When a comnuniity proudly undertakes to celebrate it's lOOtli birthday 
and to fittingly commemorate the deeds of those who have played a part in 
its founding and development, nothing is more important than the willing- 
ness of public spirited citizens to accept individual responsibility and to offer 
their best in co-operation and sacrifice. Of equal importance is the willingness 
of the organized groups to lend the constructive force of their combined 
efforts. 

Because it is justly deserved, we take this means of sincerely expressing 
our appreciation to the following : 

Our subscribers wIkjsc financial c<.iutribution makes the Celebration pos- 
sible. Our Committees who served so loyally, the mendjers of the cast of 
"Upon These Prairies" who have made it possible to ])resent the pageant 
spectacle, the newspapers, radio and T-V Stations for their fine cudpcration 
in publicizing the Celebration — to all of these we extend Thanks. 

There are many individuals not mentioned in the program to whom 
we owe our thanks. Sharing in our gratitude are many volunteer workers who 
gave freely of their time, memberships of fraternal, religious, civic, farm, 
youth groups and merchants assisted in making our daily program jjossible. 

Our Queen and her Court of Honor and the merchants wlm gave window 
space for antique displays and decorated their building fronts and those who 
entered floats and other units in the parades. 

When the preparation period comes to a close and the Celebration is being- 
enjoyed I want to take this means to personally thank each Committee 
Chairman and Conunitteeman for a job well done. For you ("i)mniittee Chair- 
men and your splendid Committees have made the General ( 'luiii'iiuurs posi- 
tion a very pleasant one. To all and everyone in ^Uirrisdii. the two little 
words — Thank You — sound inadequate. 

^Morrison Centennial. Tnc. 
W. E. Beck, Jr., Chairman. 



MAC'S BODY SHOP 

Body and Fendei" Repairing 

Dial 3953 

Morrison. 111. 


VERDICK IMPLEMENT CO. 

Morrison, 111. 
Dial 3214 

Your 
International Harvester Dealer 


BULL PRODUCE 

Hog Buyers 

Morrison. 111. Dial 4222 

H. C. Bull — A. J. Crump 


MORRISON BODY SHOP 

Auto Body Repairing 
Wheel Alignment and Balancing 

Dial 3218 
Morrison, 111. 


WILSON GREENHOUSES 

Member Of 

Florist Telegraph Delivery 

Dial 3814 


AUSTIN BROS. 

Lumber — Grain -— Machinery 

Round Grove, 111. 

Phone 3933 


HUMPHREY BARBER SHOP 

Morrison, 111. 

Dial 2364 

Hershel Meyer Bernie Humphrey 


NELSON'S ELECTRIC 

Howard Nelson 
Dial 2260 

Electrical Contracting and 
Motor Repairing 


M. G. MATTHEWS PRODUCE CO. 

Morrison. 111. Dial 2711 

Poultry — Eggs 
Edelweiss and Fox DeLuxe Beers 


HUB 
DRY CLEANERS 

Phone 3512 


SCOTTIE'S 

Watch Repair Service 

Morrison, 111. 
Dial 2290 


DEWEY MULNIX 
BARBER SHOP 



SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

MORRISON CENTENNIAL 

MAY 29 JCXE 4 

RELIGIOUS DAY 

SrXDAY, MAY I'lt. 1055 

10:00 a. m. — Morning Worship at the C'luireh of your clioice. 

2:00 p. HI. to 5:00 p. ni. — Garden Walk through Alorrison's Outstanding gardens. 

Kvcrgreen Xook, 2 miles S. E. on r^nte .No. ;J0, turn snutli dh the first road east of iljorrison ; Mr. and 
.Mrs. Alfred Collins, 300 X. Jackson; Mrs. J. E. Collogan, 204 \V. North; Mr. and Mrs. Dana Cobb, 513 
X. Base: Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred £. Gould, 107 Prospect; .Mr. an<l Mrs. Walter Zerr, 208 Olive St.; 
-Mr. and Mrs. Ealph Lane, 210 Towne St.; Mr. and ^Irs. Charles Stoodlcy, loT LeRoy; Mr. and Mrs. 
Uiihcrt K. Tracy, Lincolmvay Court; Mr. and Mrs. .Vhcrt M. Potter, 207 W. Morris; Mr. and Mrs. C. 
I.. .Vustin, Mrs. J. W. Steiner, 504 and 50s Portlan.l .Vvc. : .Mr. and Mrs. Mason ihill, 644 Genesee Ave. 

7 ::;n p. m. — \'esper Services at Morrison Community High School Athletic ficdd. 150 voice choir will sing. 

PATRIOTIC DAY 

MO.XDAV. .MAY ;]o, 1055 

Hi:()n a. ni. — \'ic\ving <>{ Historical Windows. 

2:00 p. m. — .Memorial Day address liy IJev. R. B. lleydinger at (imvc Hill Cemetery. 

■'1:00 ]i. m. — ^Memorial Day parade. 

4:30 p m. — Kewanee IJlack Knights will demonstrate competition routine. Free at the ^lorrison High 

School Athletic Field. 
4:30 p. m. — Carnival ]*lidway opens on Main Street. 

YOUTH DAY 

rCKSDAY, MAY 3J, 1955 

10:00 a. ni. — Viewing of Historical Windows. 

1 :00 p. m. — Free movies at Capitol Theatre. 

2:00 p. ui. — Swift Pet Parade. 

3 :00 p. m. — Free movies at Capitol Theatre. 

•'5:00 p. ni. Free Roller Skating at Coliseum. Carnival o]"iens with reiluced ]irices to children. 

4:30 ]>. m. — Oklahoma Ranglei-s at the Reviewing Stand. 
^ :00 p. m. — (Graduation E.xercises at the Morrison High School Auditorium. 

GOVERNOR'S DAY 

WKDXKSDAY. .TUXE 1, 1955 

10:00 a. m. — Viewing of ITistorical Windows. 

2:00 p. m. — Governor's Day Parade. Featuring the Fifth Army Band. 

4:30 p. ni. — Oklahoma Rangiers at reviewing stand. Carnival ]\Hdway opens. 

7 ::'.0 p. 111. — Concert by the Fifth Army Band at the Morrison Community High School Athletic Field. 

s:15 p. m. — First performance of "UPOX THESE PRAIRIES" at the Morrison Community High 
School Athletic Field. Fireworks following j^ageant. 

'.I :.'!0 p. 111. — (Queen's Ball at Fairgrounds Band Box. 
in it.", p. 111. — Grand March of the Queen's Ball. Led by the Queen and Governor of Illinois. 

LABOR AND INDUSTRY DAY 

d'lirUSDAY, JUXE 2, 1055 

10:00 a. m. — Viewing of Historical Windows. ■ ■ ■ , 



ED and MARVS 

CONOCO SERVICE 

Tires. Batteries and Accessories 
Lubrication and Washing 

Lincolnway & Base St. 

Morrison, 111. 



TRACY and WALTERS 

ROYAL BLUE FOOD STORE 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

Quality Meats 

Groceries 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS 
AT GOODENOUGH'S 

ICE BOX 

Fountain Service — Lunches 
Dinners 



GOODENOUGH'S 
GRADE "A" 

Dairy Products — Ice Cream 

520 W. Main St. 
George and Arthur Goodenough 

LIND'S 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 

223 West Main St. 
Morrison, 111. 



GOLDEN FARMS 
WAYNE FEEDS 

Feed's For All Livestock 

Baby Chicks — Dog Food 

Hog Si Poultry Equipment 

Water Softener Salt 

Molasses Feeds 



NATIONAL FOOD STORE 

Corner Lincolnway & Madison 

Morrison, Illinois 

Free Parking 



SCHROEDER BROS. 

General Contractor 

Building and Remodeling 

Dial 3707 - 2896 Morrison 



CLAYTON DYKEMA 

Auctioneering 
and Real Estate 

"Dependable Service" 



MORRISON, 
ILL. 





9:00 a. m. to 11:00 a. m. — Open ITmise at Carnation Milk Factory and Goodeuough's Dairy. 
11:00 a. m. — Parade. 

2:00 p. m. to o : p. ni. — Open Ilonse at General Electric, \'(.ilcknian"s Fnrniture, Climco, and Morrison 
Telephone Comijany. 
2 :00 p. ni. to 4 :o0 — Sisters of the Swish Tea at ^Miirrisim C'ounti'v t'lub. 

'■] :00 \). m. — ^Midway Carnival Opens. 

4: :'.'>() !>. ni. — Oklahoma Ranglers at reviewing stand. 

7::J0 p. ni. — Oklahoma Ranglers performing at .Morrison Community High School Athletic Field. 
N:!.') p. m. — Second performance of "UPOX THESE PRAIPIKS" at rhc Morrison High School Athletic 
Field. Fireworks folowing pageant. 

AGRICULTURAL DAY 

FRIDAY, JUXE 3, 1955 

1():0(> a. ni. — Viewing of Historical Windows. 

10:00 a. m. — Rural Graduation Exercises at Morrison Connnnnity Iligli Schnnl Auditorimn. 
1 1 :00 a. ni. — Open House at Whiteside County Farm Bureau. 
2:00 p. ni. — Parade. Carnival Midway opens. 
4 :;!0 ]i. m. — Oklalioma Ranglers at reviewing stand. 
7 :;iO ]). m. — Final jiidging of the "Sisters of the Swish." 'I'liis will he held at ^lorrison ( 'onniiunity 

High School Athletic Field. 
8:15 p. m. — Third performance of "UPOX THESK PILVIKIKS" at the Morrison ( 'onniiunity High 
School Athletic Field. Firewi:)rks following pageant. 

OLD SETTLERS DAY-'i'ms is the fixai. day of ckxtexxlvl celkbrattox 

SATl'RDAY. JUXE 4, 1955 

10:00 a. m. — Viewing of Historical Wiiidiiws. 

10:00 a. m. — Registration of "Out of Town Guests" at Iviiiiiuers Motoi' Sales. Itefreshmeiits will he 
served. Horse shoe pitching contest. 
2 :?>() p. m. — Antique Auto Parade. Carnival ]\[idway Opens. 
7:30 p. m. — Final judging of the "Brothers of the Brush." This will he held at Morrison T'ommunity 

High School Athletic Field. 
S:15 ]). 111. — Final perfornnnice of "UPOX Til RSE PRAlinKS" at the .Morrison ('onimuiiity High 
ScIkmiI Athletic Field. Fireworks following the pageant. 



RAY FRENCH 
General Agent 

FARM BUREAU INSURANCE 

Prepare Yourself for the Next Centennial with 
a Retirement Income Policy. 



WHITESIDE COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

Dedicated to 

More Purposeful and Pleasant Living" 
thru Progressive and Profitable Farming. 



HISTORY OF MORRISON 



The year iSol was a tliffioult vear fm- the liuliaiis 
of the Sae and Fox tribe?. Their #n]i]ily of eoni 
\va# verv low. Hunting had been poor. Black Hawk, 
the vigorous and energetic leader finally made the 
decision To move his tribes across the ^[ississippi Kiver 
into the Koek Kiver area and plant sod corn in hopes 
that complete starvation might be halted. lu doing 
so, he was not violating the Indian Treaties of ISIO. 
They were merely moving into some of their own 
territory. Actnally, all of this Xortli Western juu't of 
Illinois was designated as the Intnting grounds for 
these tribes. 

But in the jirooess of this movement of Indian 
pe.'ples some Braves swapjied ]ielts for fire water, and 
became fired wf. Several white men were scalped ami 
before anyone knew what had ha]ipened the I>lack 
Hawk War had begim. 

General "\Miiteside miived witli his IJattalidii (if 
Scotus and Rangers inti^ the area of Prophetstown in 
the Spring of "32. General Atkinson followed with a 
Kegiment of Volunteers from the Soutliern Cotmties. 
X'l major engagement was fought in this area, only 
minor skirmishes, btit as the troops of the Vohmteer 
Army moved across these prairies, they saw the oj)- 
prirtunity and challenge of settlement. Thus it was 
the Black Hawk War which actually signaled the 
lieginning of the history of ^lorrisim. 

THE PIOXEERS 

Tw(:i (if the men (:if that volunteer army who 
civissed this land were Wm. H. Paschal and .T(;ihn D. 
Paschal. They saM- the open, slightly rolling prairies 
of grass, waiting for the plow to open its sleej^ing 
piiwers of growth. They saw the grcives of tintlier 
as potential cabins and fencing, the plentiful game 
as provisions, the springs as refreshing drink. They 
saw and remembered. F(>r by ls;35 they were back 
with their families. 

il'iving northward from !Mi:irgan and Cass conn- 
tie-; in IMid Western Illinois, they brought their peo- 
ple across the Indian trails by covered wagons, tuitil 
they reached a certain creek, spring and grove of 
trf-es. Tliere they began to erect the first log cal)in in 
^Jt. Pleasant township. It was just east and north of 
the place which was to be ^Morrison. Since it was 
already November and winter was almost u]3on them, 
their first concern was t" build a cabin. At best it 
was only emergency shelter. It had no chimney and 
all the cooking had to be done out of ddors. The flo(ir 
was half log. and half earth. One of the men slit his 
fiMit T.\-ith an axe and put an end to the luxury (jf a 
floor. Obviotisly, it was not finished that winter, 
but it did manage to house the 19 people of the 
Paschal. French and Thomas fatnilies. The next 
spring they liroke the prairie and phmted the first 



crop of sod corn to be grown in .Mt. Pleasant Town- 
ship. 

()th(i -(Trill- «(■!■( iiiM\ iii^ in. .T(hu W. Stakes 




MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. PASCHAL, two of Morrison's 
tirst pioneers, settled near here in 1835, spending the first 
winter with other settlers in a cabin built by John's broth- 
er, William H. Paschal, in a location just northeast of Ar- 
thur Badger's residence on North Jackson street. 

and Joshua Atkinson had gone up from Prophetstown 
in the spring of '■]'> and staked ottt claims in Rottnd 
Grove. According to the rights of sqtiatters all yott 
had to do was place the foundation of a cabin or plow 
."i acrt's of groiiiK.l and you had staked a claim. Stakes 
and Atkinson did that but made the mistake of going- 
down to Rock Island for tools and eqtiipment. "Wlien 
they returned the claim had lieen jtimped and they 
appai'ently conldii't get possession (if their claim. So 
they followed an Indian trail to the West until they 
came to a creek. Atkinson chose tlie West liank. Stakes 
the East, and jirocecdcd to cur and stake their new 
claims. Jolin Stakes had no wav of kn(.iwinii' it, but 



tlu' |ilacc wlici'c 111- l)iiilt liis caliiii is imw the (/onier 
of ^l.iidiriou uikI LiiK'oliiwav, and the c^lit acres uf laud 
he broke to the plow and planted in corn, was to be 
an important part of Morrison. Atkinson had ehijseu 
the north cdue of the future Union\illi'. IJy lSo~, 
.lames Jvnox was also in the same loealitv. Jie Ijiiilt 
his ealiin and dug his well on the northwest corner 
that we now call Base and Main. 

For a time it seemed as if the fiUure of this area 
was to be tied to a potential settlement nortli of where 
Stakes had settled. In 1S35, Jonathan liaines, a me- 
chanic and inventor crossed the ujiper Iiock (.'reek 
near tlie jdace we now call Jacobstow ii. He was on 
his wav to (iah'iia from Peoria, liopiiiii' to install his 
new invention, a high ])owered steam engine on steam 
Ixiats so that they could haul the lead out of Galeiui 
through the winter. 'J'lie ohl " Peoria-Galena" stage 
passed modern .Morrison one half mile north of its 
present citv limits, following the old Lewistown trail. 
Apparently Haines had some op]jortnnity to rest at 
this place and observe the country. He was impress- 
ed with its possibilities and the water ]iower piitential. 
lie delayed his journey to Galemi hmg enotigli to build 
a small cabin and establish claim to tlie land on the 
East side of Rock Creek. He hired Felix French ( wIki 
liad staked a claim just south of Morrison) to s])cnd 
the winter in that cabin and keep the claim open. 
Haines returned in the spring of ';!(i and erected the 
first saw mill in this area. He had just cut the first 
log, when a flash flood carried the mill away an<l he 
had to begin again. He later adileil imi'i- stones so that 
grain could be ground. 

Jonathan Haines had great hopes for the im- 
meiliate vieinit\' surrounding that mill of hi-. In \^:',7 



he laid out "Illinois <'iiy,'" just west of the Creek and 
Jac<jbstowu. lie incliuled ten acres in the project, all 
unimprcived. but then they were offered withoirt cost 
t<j anyone who was interested. It was even marked on 
the maps, in bigger letters than Springfield, the 
capitol of the State, but no one ever built there. 

For one thing, e\'en though the "Peoria-Galena" 
trail went through there, it could neit compete with 
Jacobstown, less than one half mile East. Beginning 
with the saw and grist mill this community grew to 
include a blacksmith, coopei- shop, and even a store. 
A second mill of stone was erected in 1852. 

Btit ovcw more, Illinois City cotild not com]jete 
with rnionville. Starling with the claim ui Josliua 
.Vtkinson this favorable location soon attracted other 
pioneers. John 11. iiobertsoii, newly arrived from New 
York, s(4tle(l in Fnionville and proceeded to erect a 
saw mill in jsoli with the assistance of Benjamin 
Jiurns, an early teacher. With '',000 acres of timber 
locateil ,\orih of .Morrison, this business was assur- 
ed a thriving fiUiire. I )oirr let the fact that Robert- 
son was al)le to shoot a ileei' within the community 
limits kec]) you from thinking that Unionville was 
growing. ISy 1^4 1 a tliri\-ing village had begun to 
center around this eiitei'prise, enough so, tluit in the 
saiiK' year some of the early settlers, Boyer, Ustick, 
iLobertson, and .\tkinson. could ])lat and survey the 
city. It was a splendid location for a town and it was 
so ap]iarent that it rather than Jacobstown would be 
the important business center, that Haines, the builder 
of the saw mill at Jacobstown, decided to manufac- 
ture his newly iii\'enied "Illinois Harvester" in Union- 
\"il'' . Till;- t'ai'iii i!nii-!iii,e;'\" w.i- I n-Liinnini;' to be pro- 




The Old Settlers" Log Cabins at the Fair Grounds, Dedicated in 1885 



SINCE 1910 

The Morrison Candy Kitchen 

Has Served The Community With 
Ice Cream — Lunches — Magazines 


SCHIPPER'S 
STANDARD SERVICE 

John Lee Schipper, Prop. 

Oil — Greases — Accessories 

Phone 3991 


Meats , 


^fffl^ 


Clare 
V Chapin 

1 


VERN'S HOME FURNISHINGS 

Vernon D. Renkes 

Furniture, Bedding, Rugs & Carpeting 

Hoover Sweepers 

110 E. Main Morrison, Illinois 


' { 


r 1 : 


Groceries * 


y. FOOP J 


fJ Lloyd 
Null 




^ " ^ 




WILKENS IGA 
SUPER MARKET 

Groceries, Meat and Vegetables 
Phones 3223 & 4223 


BUTCHER BROTHERS 

Movers Of Buildings 
and Heavy Machinery 

Phone 2671 & 2602 
Morrison, 111. 


Farmers" Elevator & Supply Co. 

Est. .July 1919 

Grain — Feed — Seed 
Fertilizer — Fencing — Posts 

Dial 2011 


RIEP BRANDS 

Heating and Air Conditioning 
Appliances — Sheet Metal Work 

Dial 4512 203 West Main St. 


IRVIN WORKMAN 

Heating & Air Conditioning 

Gas — Oil — Coal Furnaces — Spouting 

Norge Appliances 

Phone 3713 304 E. Main St. 


YARBROUGH'S 
D-X SERVICE 

Tires — Lubrication — Accessories 
Phone 2153 


BARNIE'S SUPER SERVICE 

Gasoline — Tires 
Batteries 

Phone 3114 


BRICKLEY SERVICE STATION 

Gas — Oil — Tires — Tubes 
Accessories 

Phone 2319 231 E. Main St. 



duced from 1847 on. 

The period of ls:i:> to 1S50 luiglit well be called 
the time of the pioneer. It was dttring these l.'i vcars 
that the eoiiiitry was opened t<i the white man, that 
the trees were felled to provide logs for cabins, I'ails 
fur fences, Inndier fur buildings. The rough ttirf was 
plowed and the fields sown to corn and wheat. Life 
was in general isolation and what few eoinnniuitics 
there were, grew in connection with saw mills and 
grist mills, always located on streams and creeks where 
water powei- cuidd be harnessed for work. A'o matter 
how if might be romanticized, life in those days was 
rotigli. 

For a family moving into this mdiroken land 
their wagon, horses, oxen, and few possessions W(>re all 
iliey had. They lived in their wagons tmtil they could 
erect their cabins. These were made <d' logs. chinkiMJ 
with lime, or moss, tisually \vith only inie window, 
and with a rough shingle roof. It was certain to leak 
rain en' snow and many a night was spent holding an 
tnnl)rella oi- catching water in ]3ans. There was only 
one room which at night coidd be divided by a sheet 
strung on a rope <ir wire. Trundle beds of rough 
briarils. rope spi'ings and grass or corn slmek mattresses 
gave sol ill comfort to weary liodies. Of course the 
loft gave space for an infinite number of sleepers. 

Cooking was usually ilone out of doors, at best 
in a shed btiilt against the cabin, fireplaces were a 
luxury that only the well established could take time 
to build. 

After the necessary shelter was assured, the next 
task was to work on the land. This was a back lireak- 
ing task. First the ground had to be broken to culti- 
vation. It took a team of oxen to do it, and if a team 
wasn't owned it would cost about $2.50 an acre to 
have it done. Working steadily, a man could expect 
to break 20 to 40 acres of ground a year. It was a 
slow process of adding more land each year. Similar- 
ly, the land had to be fenced. This was universally 
done by split rails. Either split at home, or bonghi 
at the cost of about $2.00 a hundred. It was this cost 
of rails and the added cost of hauling them by ox 
team that determined the exact position of choice 
settlements. Tlie first claims were always staked aloni: 
groves of tind)er that edged the ])rairie. with a ratio 
of two to one. For every acre of prairie, there was 
one acre of timber. Fencing was a mtist no matt(>r 
how back fireaking for the hogs that provided the 
meat diet of these early people would utake short 
work of an tnifenced field. The average yield of an 
acre of ground was about 50 bushels of sod corn. 

Actually the problem of growing the grain was 
not even half as difficult as selling it. Transportation 
was almost non-existent. The only way in and out 
of the cotmtry was by wagon ,iver trails and nnbi'iducd 
rivers. It took twelve days to liatd a load of corn to 
Chicago, the most adequate market for this locality. 



It cost 25 cents a bushel to have someone do it for 
you. Quite often it was business by barter oidy. A. 
C. Jackson for example hauled pigs to Savannah and 
(lalena where he sold them for one cent a pound in 
trade, the trade being remnants of calico, not one 
being large enottgh to make a dress. Indeed barter was 
the liest means of economy since the legal tender of 
the time was mucli in doulit. For a while in the mid 
:]0's, the scalji (jf a wolf was honored at its full value 
more often than the printed baidv notes that were 
in circulation. 

The diet of these early i)eo]ile was quite restrict- 
ed. Their coffee was a substitute nuide from wheat, 
rye. [xitatoes, or burnt bread. Corn made into hominy 
or pone, nnide up the central meal. Pork was the 
major meat disli. (Jame. and x'enison of course was 
ailded to this diet along with berries and fish. But 
on the whole it was short in vegetables and fruits. In 
fact, there was to be no fruit production in this area 
for (piite some time. Potatoes were also grown, but 
were not in abundant supply. 

Almost all of the early settlers had coine from 
the Fast<'rn States ami remeirdjered and missed the 
schools and churches of their former homes. They 
were not long in securing these for themselves and 
their children. The first school was startecl in a log 
cal)in in Paschal's timber, north and east of Moi'rison, 
in ls;is. \\r. Hall of .Massachusetts was the first 
teacher. He received a salaiy <if 10 dollars a month 
and was boarded arouml. I'nionville also devdoped 
its school in the IJoyer ( 'aliiii north of Aloi-rison, and 
by C^4n had managed to erect a schoid building which 
stood just Kast of the present structure in that com- 
ninnily. 

The ('hui-ches were not long in (-(jming. By lS3(i 
a Alethodist niissicjuary, or "local preacher" as they 
were calleil, was ludding religious services in the 
Thoimis cabin. Rev. ( 'artwright also rode a circuit 
reaching from Pockford to Rock Island. He reached 
this Morrison area about once every four weeks to 
hold sei-\-ices. Through the effVirt of such men the 
iNfethodist Kpiscojial ( 'hiircli was organized in Fiiion- 
ville in 1^42 and a bnihling erected in 1S55. The 
coiigregatiomtlist also organized their church in Fnion- 
ville in 1844. Other denominations were to follow. 

Xeedless to say there was no such thing as com- 
mercial entertainment. These early jieople had to en- 
tertain themseh'es, or not at all. One of the forms 
of annisement was singing. The first settler, J. T). 
Paschal, had organized a singing school and in the 
year 18:;ri this groti]} met at the Boyer caljin. Much 
to everyone's sur]n-ise and enjoyment, this time was 
-elected f(U- a sur]:)rise wedding. ^Vfter Air. John 
Powell and Miss Cam])l:)ell were ])ronotinced man 
and wife, the party and bampiet which fcdlowed was 
a doid)le enjoyment. Perhaps it was this lack of 
soiihisticated entertainment ccinnected to the hard work 



HO^IE APPLIANCE CO. 

204 E. Main St. 

Phone 4212 
Morrison. 111. 


MAC GILVRAY'S 

Ben Franklin Store 
104 W. Main Ph. 3914 


PADDOCK 

CLEANERS 

Dial 3115 


AL'S ELECTRIC SERVICE 

Electric Wiring Contracting & Repairing 

Refrigerators — Water Heaters & Softeners 
Appliances 

Phone 3216 225 W. Main St. 


BERNHARDY MOTOR SERVICE 

General Motor Repair 

Phone 3614 

Howard Bernhardy — Bruce Van Kooten 


Morrison Implement Company 

FARM TRACTORS 
AND IMPLEMENTS 
ALLIS CHALMERS 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Morrison, Illinois 
Phone 2514 Lincolnway West 


REYNOLDS FUNERAL HOME 

Est. - 1860 

Abe Renkes Morrison, 
Owner Illinois 


Compliments Of 

McCOY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Professional Insurance Service 


TOMLINSON FUNERAL HOME 

Leon E. Tomlinson, Jr. 
Director 

Morrison Amboy 


BOB YARBROUGH'S 
MORRISON ELECTRIC SERVICE 

Home, Farm & Commercial Wiring 

Appliance Repair 

Hotpoint Appliances 

Dial 4575 503 E. Main 


CARPENTER'S BAKERY 

Home Pastries — Party Cakes 
119 E. Mam Phone 2913 


HARRY J. WATT 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Also Insurance of All Types 

Dial 4113 

305 Lincolnway West 



(if llic day, that gave the pioneer his sense i>f hos- 
pitality. \'isiting was high on the list. The latch 
string was always ont to welcome strangers and there 
\va< always room for one more in the crowded cabins. 
It is reported that when the first woman in this town- 
shij), .Mrs. Paschal, heard that another family had 
arrivcil in Projihetstowu, she saddled a horse and 
rode across the prairie for a visit. 

Snch then, was life as the first people of our 
locality experienced it. It was not easy, but then an 
amazing nuniher of tlieni li\'e<l long anti active lives. 
At least there were no Indians to kill off the first 
pioneers. The few who remained or wandered through 
were more of a nuisance of petty thievery, than scalp- 
ing parties. Ijut the work of the settler was an im- 
poi'tant task although they did not look upon it as 
>ucli. They iipeni'd the way for those who followed, 
riicy liuill the foundation of all which was to come. 
TllK R.VILRO.M) 

Actually it was transportation which held the key 
to the future. The entire Western area of Illinois was 
develojuug into farming counti'v. The promise of its 
fantastic fertility w;is heing realized. But the in- 
di\-idual farmer could never go beyond the stage of 
raising his own food and a minimum surplus as long 
as it cost him almost the total value of the crop to 
get it to market. Il' it cost I'.'i cents a bushel to get 
the corn to a |)lace where it could l)(> sold for 2'> 
cents to .")() cents a husliid, flic assured mai'gin of profit 
was almost non-existent. 

Consequently, those early y(>ars were ones of 
struggling to develo]) means of communication. The 
obvious means of trans[)ortation \\'as of course the 
waterways. The Mississip|)i lliver became the high- 
way into the heart of the nation. Steamboats were 
soon going as far as Rockford along the Rock River. 
Barges and flat boats hauled tons of grain and live- 
stock from the farming areas into the larger cities. 
.\n<l the inventi\'eness nf man was soon brought into 
])lay. ( 'anals were added to suppliment and improve 
the natiii'al watcn'ways. The Ilennipiu Canal, the 
I Ilinois-.M ississi]ipi ('anal were all develojmients of 
this age. 

I!ut for a conmiunity like ours, \'> miles from 
the nearest na\igalilc sti-cam, water ways were not 
the aiiswei'. We neciled roads. Roads that crossed 
i'i\'crs on bridges, not forded them; roads that were 
nioi'c ihan im|)r(j\(Ml Indian trails. Consequently, the 
rnionvilh-Knltoii itoad was surveyed in 1S39. 1837 
mark('(l the l)eginning of an improved road to take 
th<' |ilace ni' the Tewistown frail that connected Peoria 
anil (ialena. This first state road crossed the R<ick 
i;i\(T al>o\-(' I'roplietstown. This time also s;iw the 
inipro\-cmcnt of the frail that led to Sterling. 

lint the i-oails Were not enough. Horses could ])ull 
a load but l'() t,, i'.") miles a day. Oxen were nnich 
slower. The market of the East could never be reach- 



ci] by the crops of the West until a faster, more cer- 
tain mode of trans])ortation was devised. The railroad 
was the answer. 




The Railroad Kra of Whiteside ( 'oiuity really be- 
gan in isno when the Galena and Chicago Union Rail- 
road was completed as far as Rockford. By "52 it was 
completed to Freeport and the.se tw-o cities became the 
trade centers and shipping points. The next step was 
the Dixon branch of this road completed in '54 making 
1 )ixon the focal point of East- West transport. It was 
just a matter of time ami the road would lie in to 
the .Mississip])i River. 

It was more by accident than by determination 
that the line was run through .Morrison. As might be 
gathered hy the name, the railroad was supposed to 
b(^ built to Galeiui, north of here. l>ut, of all the rail- 
roads in the United States this line was the only one 
that was built without government sxdjsidy. Its origi- 
nal ])ur]>ose was to be id' service to the farmer and 
every effort was nuide to have the local farmers own 
its stock and not an Eastern Corjjoration. Conse- 
qtiently, the miles of line were built in spurts ami 
s|)urs and liy the time it reached Freeport, the Alil- 
waukee Road had gotten to Galena ahead of 
them. The now mis-named Galena and Chicago Union 
Railroail -was then swung South to Dixon and finally 
made its contact with the Mississippi River at Ftdton, 
."i(t miles soiuh id' its proposed western terminal. 

One other interesting thing devtdoped that was 
unique to this railroad, now known as the Xortli 
Western. It was Iniilt to hatil grain and stock into 
the Chicago market, consequently all of its original 
station locations were located on the south side of the 
tracks and all of the signals were jdaced at the right 
hand side. There was so little freight otit fi-om Chi- 
cago in those days that it was not considered neces- 
sary to have loading equipment or sjaace on the north 
side id' the tracks. ( 'onsequeutly. when the second 
track was added, it could not be jdaced on the south 
of the existing track because of the station location 
and the signals. Tt had to be placed on the north with 
the result that the North Western is the only line in 
this countrv which runs on reverse lines. (This is the 



Compliments 

F.E. KETOLA-D.D.S. 


KARL YOST 


Compliments 

H. A. CRAMER - D.D.S. 


Compliments 

DR. E. R. SMITH 

Optometrist 


BULL, LUDENS & POTTER 


Compliments 

D. A. FELL, M.D. 


Riordon, Fletcher & Nelson 


Compliments 

L VANDERMYDE - M.D. 


WALTER ZERR 


Compliments 

J. A. MARSHALL - D.D.S. 


Compliments 

C. J.GRONNER-D.D.S. 


Compliments 

VV. W. ROBINSON - M.D. 



exijlanation given by the Xorth Western historians, 
and runs counter to the idea that the traffic is reversed 
lieeause of English engineers.) 

In any ease, the Cuilena, Chicago line was survey- 
ed through tliis area in is.'il. It followed a natural 
grade which ran through our present cemetery, ini- 
uiediately in front of the vault. This woidd have 
meant a slmrt fill nver the creek h(ittonis and a sta- 
tinii ill I'niiiiix'ille. It was hy far the hotter engineer- 
ing p(issil)ility. 

Perhaps that was the trouble. It was such an 
obvious roiUe for the new raili'oad that the iieopk' uf 
rniomillc deniaudcd a high [iriw for their property 
a;:d the i-iglit af way. 'I'lii'v thought the railroad had 
iMi other choice. There was another choii'e as we all 
kiiow toihiy. It was this route just S(nuh of the original 
line tliat was selected even thotigh it meant a long 
gicide, a. id a longer route, rndoubtedly, it cost much 
more tha'i the denuuideil |)rice for rnioiiville land, 
bur tempers could be shirt even in those days. 

A man by the name of Lyman Johnson was tlie 
contract(U' for the graded road construction from Union 
Cirove to Ftilton. lie established the base of his op- 
erations somewhere on the Stakes and Knox farms. As 
a side line he built and operated a store that sold 
mainly to railroad employees. At any rate, it was 
during the construction of this road grade that L\inan 
Johnson envisaged the existence <>i a town on the site 
of his store. He bought the laud iu l^'>2. secured the 
jjromise of a railroad station, forme(l a company (_if 
astute men tci ju'ouiote the jxiteiitial city. .loining him 
in this venture were .Mr. 11. S. Vi-imm, liomer ('as- 
well. John W. Stakes, .lauie- Snyder. L. 11. Rcjiinsou, 
X. ^[. Jacks.m, John West, and W. II. Van Epp.s. By 
l^o.'i they \vere in a positinn to survey ami plat the 
fields which were then co\'ered with scrub oak and 
hazelbush. W. S. Wilkinson, the county surveyor com- 
p!.;?d that job and the town was laid out in IJocks 
a;;d lots bdunded by the streets, Knox, (;ra])e, Suutli 
and Cliiitoii. \Mien the first railroad train arrived in 
October li'. l."^.")."i. a new jiliase of life was readv to 
begin. The new shipping p(.iint for the region would 
beeouie "^Morrison", a town which was just one h<ius«- 
big. 

That early railroad which s<i change<l the lite of 
our community was not the engineering masterjuecc 
of the modern times. In the first jilace the i-oad bed 
was not solid. The ties were just placed on top of 
gravel. Then stringei-s. or j.ing wouden lieaius would 
be laid aloug the top of the ties. To these stringers 
\\-ere fastened the rails, bars of wrought iron, oiu' inch 
thick. a::il three inches wiile. They were secure<l to 
the striiiiiir with sjiikes but it was a job to get them 
in i)lace without lea\-i'.ig them above the rail to jar the 
wheels. 

Quite often these rails wi.uld work loose and the 
ends wotdd curl up. These "snak*' heads," as they were 



called, wotdd really wreck the train as they would 
ram right up throtigh the foor of the passenger car, 
ptilling the train to a stop and ripping uj^ the ties. 
Every locomotive carried a sledge hammer as standard 
equipment so that the engineers could get out and 
fasten down the rails as thev went aloug. 

Ijad as it might souiul, it was o\-er these road 
beds that the productivity of this area moved into the 
market, and it was this railroad that signalled the 
futtire of oni' Town. 

EAKLV DAYS OK .MORRISOX 

As you might expect, the first months (if the ex- 
istence of this new community were ones of building 
and expansion. Samtiel ilcCrea. a recent arrival from 
Xew York State, decided to hw-ate a grain elevator. 
He shipped the luudier for the warehouse as far as 
Round Grove on the work train, in the late summer 
i>{ '')'<, hauled it by wagon to .Morrison and had his 
buihling up in Sejitember, one month before the first 
commercial train arrived, lie shipped the first load 
of Grain, October 1, 1^.")."). 

Lyman .lohnsou had already erected his home 
which was expamfed into a hotel. The second house, 
that of the conductor and station master, arrived on a 
flat car and was set u]i on October 20th. From then on 
it mushroomed. At first it was but shanties springing 
tip among the brush, and a constant appearance of new 
lights, as one early traveler reported. Then new busi- 
nesses built their ipiarters, ami ]\Iain street began to 
take shajie. .Mr. I'stick, who had first settled in ITnion- 
\'ille, saw that the business oi)])orttiuity was in Mor- 
rison ami he moved his general merchandise and gro- 
cery store in 1S,">.') thereby establishing the first store. 

The same year saw the erection of the blacksmith 
shop of TlKunas McClelland, a brick works and kiln 
]iut into operation by A. S. Tyron. These bricks were 
to be u.sed in most of the stibstantial business houses 
aiid homes soon to be erected. The first bricks went 
into the Baptist ( 'hurch wliicli was btiilt in lS.")6-.57. 

By Is,")7 tli(> future and success of the town was 
a.ssureil. Merchants, mechanics and professional peo- 
ple had nii>ved into the town. 

.\Ir. ('harles IJeiu. in his history of Morrison gives 

this acH'Muiit which cannot be improved upon. 

"By 1857 the following firms were engaged in 
business: John M. Cobleigh, merchant tailor and 
clothier: R. M. & J. H. Johnson, dry goods; Neely & 
Johnson, dry goods and groceries; Spears & Bro., 
dry goods and groceries; O. B. Crosby, groceries and 
provisions; I. Burton, groceries and provisions; S. W. 
& F. H. Robinson, hardware dealers; W. L. Coe & 
A. r^owlen drugs, medicines, i>aints. oils and glass; 
S. H. RlcCrea & Co., dealers in grain and lumber; 
■J. V. Giles & Co., grain and lumber dealers; John H- 
Brown. produce dealer; Chas. Foster, grain buyer: 
Edwin L. Johnson, grain and coal dealer: Henrv 
Levett and B. O. Russell, in the hotel business; Vroom 
& Brokaw, livery stable; Wm. Trauger, groceries: 
Alphonso Bent, and Laune & Thompson, painters: 
H. A. &. C. J. Johnson, attorneys at law; R. Thomp- 
son, auctioneer; L. H. Robinson, Lyman Johnson, Olm- 



PETERSON'S DRUG STORE 

Walgreen Agency 

TOILETRIES — DRUGS — WALLPAPER 
PAINT — SUNDRIES 

DIAL 3511 


BLASS CLOTHING STORE 

Men's and Boys' Clothing 

Furnishing Goods 

and Shoes 


ARDSEN'S 

Store for Men & Boys 
Morrison, 111. 


DONICHY'S DRUG STORE 

Hazel D. Donichy John R. Donichy, R.PH. 

™^ Rexall STORE 

Established 1923 

Morrison, Illinois 

32 Years "Professional Service' to the Community 


FROST'S 

The Men's Shop 

Men's Clothing & Furnishings 

Dial 3615 Morrison, 111. 


H. B. WILKINSON CO. 

Abstracts of Title — Title Insurance 
MORRISON, ILLINOIS 


Compliments 

Morrison Veterinary Clinic 

J. H. Moret - DVM A. M. Olson - DVM 


FITZGERALD DRUG STORE 

105 W. Main Street Morrison, Illinois 

Prescriptions — Drugs — Toiletries 

Wallpaper — Glass 


EDDIE SCHULER 

DODGE TRUCKS 
USED CARS 

Phones 3433 and 4433 229 E. Main St. 
Morrison, 111. 


CARLEY MOTORS 

BUICK (p-^ 

V-8 ^ -^ 
^ ° PONTIAC 

SALES and SERVICE 

Phone 3215 230 E. Main St. 
MORRISON, ILLINOIS 




lotor Sales OLDSMOBILE 

Sales 
t — Telephone 2171 

& 

, ILLINOIS S^"^'^^ 


rn^hF Morrison \ 

Cars 
„ 627 Lincolnway Eas 

^™^''' MORRISON 



stead & Gridley, and Knox & McCrea, engaged in 
selling town lots; Wm. Finch, groceries and boots and 
shoes; Thos. JNIcClelland and Sol Eshleman, black- 
smiths; F. W. Chapman, jeweler. John M. Cobleigh 
is the only one mentioned who is still engaged in the 
same business in Morrison. 

A large business was transacted by the merchants, 
and considerable quantities of grain and other pro- 
duce were shipped. From July 1, 1856 to July 1, 
1857, 175,000 bushels of whea; were shipped froni 
Morrison, the price ranging from 75 cents to $1.00 
per bushel. In 1857 the brick stores now occupied by 
Spears & Son, Spears & Shafer, J. S. Green and 
Robt. Wallace, were erected by Charles and William 
Spears. W. L. Coe. John McDonald, John Devine. 
John D. Bartholf, and John Weaver. This was the 
first brick block erected in Morrison. The same year 
the railroad company erected a depot building, and 
a number of residences sprang up in different parts 
of the town. Good business lots sold at from $150 
to $350. and residence locations at from $75 to $100. 
The strip of table land now occupied by numerous 
fine residences was laid off and placed in market 
about this time by Mr. Peter Knox." 
Tlio city was indeed underway. 
Etit if the arrival of the railroad was the most 
important determining factor in the history of Mor- 
rison and its grov.-th, certainly the location of the 
county scat here was the second most important event. 
This assured the residency of officials and lawyers, 
and with them other professional peoj^le. A whole 
commnnity of loaders and citizens, came into existence 
around just this one institution. 

The location of the County seat was a great con- 
trcversy that went on for almost 20 years. After the 
organization of ^\Tiiteside county on May G, 1S3S, 
Prophetstown, Fulton, Lyndon, Sterling, Albany and 
Erie began to pressure for the honor of being the 
county seat town. Xo one city received a majority 
and the same results were repeated election after elec- 
tion, one every four weeks. As a temporary solution, 
it was decided to locate the County Seat at Lyndon 
and the Court House was erected there in 1840. Ap- 
parently the election of 1^40 which finally decided 
to locate the county seat in Lyndon was disputed quite 
vigorously by Sterling. The dispute was with grounds 
for the recount showed that Sterling had received the 
majority. Subsequently, the Cinnity Court was mov- 
ed to Sterling in 1S41. 

This made everyone else upset. Xo one knew 
where it should be located, so court was held in both 
places, and the State Legislature was asked to decide. 
There followed a series of decisions: 184.3, Lyndon: 
1S4G, Sterling: 1S4U, Sterling; 1S57, Morrison. 

What happened was that Morrison had been 
formed as a city in the meantime. It took advantage 
of all this bickering and started to pull a few wires 
down in the State Legislature and in the election 
which was ordered in 1^57 to decide the issue once 
and fur all it managed to win over Sterling as a 
County wide vote, IGSl to 1572. 

On moving to ]\Iorris(in the County Court met 
in the Concert Hall, (Above Fitzgerald's) and land 
was set aside for the buildings. These were completed 



by 1866 and in spire of the pressure brought by both 
Sterling and Fttltou it was never moved. 

Thus l>y l^fjti, ^lorrison was a thriving com- 
munity, impoi'tant in ecuniimic and agricultural de- 




^-,<» 



] 



'^^.x 



^ i 






Court House About 1872 

velojmient, active in ])olitics and bustling over with 
enthusiasm. For this new city the fttture was un- 
limited. 




Old Time Grocery Store 



THE MORRISON CENTENNIAL CORPORATION 



Proudly Presents the Dramatic Historical Spectacle 



ii 



on IHESE PRfl 




A JOHN B. ROGERS PRODUCTION 

Directed By 
ALFRED H. SRNKA 



PIIOLOGUE 

A brilliant scene in which "Miss Centennial" 
welcomes visitors from every corner of the nation. Snr- 
roimded bv beautiful ladies in the Covirt, The Queen's 
Cadets, Sailorettes, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, The 
Mf'imted Guard, and the guard of Honor she gTeets 
representatives from the forty-eight states. 



THE I^TEW FKOIs^TTEE 

The early settlers <<£ ilorrison faced many hard- 
ships, Init tliere was always time to welcome wagon 
trains and be hospitable to the newcomers to the ter- 
]'itory. .'Vll was not work in these times. After chores 
were done, the folks enjoyed a good old-fashioned 
hoe-dowai. 



THIS IS MOREISOX 

A salute to the pjioneers of Morrison who with 
flashing axes felled the growth of timber in order 
to found a settlement in the new Land Of Promise. 

THE HERITAGE OF FREEDOM 

Beneath the tall trees of Morrison, the Indians 
paused in their meandering to camp and hunt. Here 
they prayed for fertility, danced to ajijjcase their 
Gods and carrv on their familv life. 



AX KAIM.V .MARRIAGE 

I'lie first wedding to take place in this County 
\\as at Ijovits ('aliiu just north of Morrison. This 
was als<i the hdiiic of llie first Singing School in this 
area. 

1!Kmf;mp.er ttie sabbath 

When tlie first settlers came to this land, they 
l)rouglit not only their determination and courage, but 
auDther priceless gift, their belief in God. 



THE DAWX OF EDUCATIOI^ 



BIKES. BUSTLES AND MUSTACHES 



As the area increased in population, education 
became a subject of great consideration to the people 
of Morrison. From the crude surroundings of a simple 
beginning to the fine systems of schools today, Mor- 
rison has progressed in its march toward a higher 
educational standard. 



It was the era of "The Bicycle Built for Two," 
"Leg "O ]\Iutton Sleeves,'" and "Wasp-Like Waists.'' 
The innn\-ation called the "horseless carriage'' made 
its appearance and caused quite a sensation. All good 
clean fun of the "Gay 90's" reminiscent of the days 
when "Grandma" was in her teens. 



JUST OXE HUXDRED YEARS AGO 

]\Iorrison was surveyd and laid out in 1855 by 
\V. S. Wilkinson, surveyor under the management of 
Lyman Johnson, whcj came to this area as a railroa<l 
contracti.ir and builder. 



I'lIE BAI'TLE FOR FREEDOM 

The year was lUM. and again the j^eople of Mor- 
rison heard the troubling sounds of war in the mak- 
ing. The climax came in 1017 when the Lusitania was 
torpedoed and the Unitcil States entered the war. 



THK co.MIXG OF THE IROX HORSE 

I'he ju'oprietors of the town were men of enter- 
prise and l)usiness sagacity, and by liberal dealings 
secured the location of the railroad station where it 
is now, and the future of Morrison was assured. 



TIIK ROAIM.X TWENTIES 

l!»i'T, the year prosperity abounded. It was the 
age of "Flag Pole Sitters," "Plus Fours," and Flap- 
]iers. A dance sensation hit the nation and everyone 
in Morrison was doint;' the Charleston. 



UXIOXVILLE RILED OVER RAILROAD 

Tlie feeling between Unionville and Morrison 
was intensely bitter. The citizens of Unionville re- 
fused to visit IMorrison for their mail. 



SEIGE FOR FREEDOil 

With the startling news that came to the United 
States on that quiet afternoon of December 7, 1941, 
war came to us for the second time in a generation. 



MORRISOX, THE COUXTY SEAT 

The location of tlie county seat was a great con- 
troversy and went on for almost twenty years. In 1857 
the State Legislature ordered an election to decide the 
issue once and for all. 



TIIK ^M()1;KIS0X hall of FAME 

In the past century, ]iIorrison has produced many 
fine citizens. We would like to take time to honor 
these prominent sons who have contributed so much 
to their City, County and Country. 



THE GOLD RUSH 

.Moi'rison was also a part of a large country and 
the hopes and fears and dreams of the nation were 
reflected here. When gold was discovered at Pikes 
Peak and a rush dveloped, I\fcrrison heard about it 
and sent its representatives. 

THE WAR BETWEE.V THE STATES 

Event followed event. The Southern States seced- 
ed from tlie Union one by one. In a juatter of hours 
after the outbreak of war many men of ^Morrison 
left their jobs to answer the call. 



THK ATO:\[IC AGE 

With the arrival of the lO-tO's came man's knowl- 
edge of siditting the atom. The recent experiment at 
Yucca Flats makes you stop, and wonder and think. 
Is this the beginning of a new advanced civilization, 
or the destructive end. 

FIXATE 

There arc no bounds or limits to the frontiers of 
freedom. As we build so builds our state and our na- 
tion. S(i pi-oudly we liail. "Morrison's Second Cen- 
tnrv" .... 

SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE 

LRC Oi.^ro2 



Life in a commimity meaut quite a transformation 
for those -who had come as settlers. For one thing- 
there were stores where thing's wonki be purchased. 
If for example vott entered the Cothing store of 
Spear and Brothers, an arrav of goods, undreamed of 
a decade before, -would dauee before vour eyes. There 
would be ladies' dress goods, hats, caps, bonnets, hos- 
ierv, boots, shoes, crockery, hard-ware and groceries. 
Their motto, displaye^l in large letters was in itself 
reassuring: "Live and let live I" We charge nothing 
for showing goods, and it would also be a temptation 
to investigate further. 

Xo longer was one dependant upon bottled nos- 
trimis from the East, or Indian remedies in case of 
emergency. The drug store of Coe and Xowlen ad- 
vertised "pure medicine." In addition there was: 
liquors (for medicinal ptirposes only, of course), oil, 
paints, glass, dye woods, book paper, fine groceries 
a^d fancy articles stich as flutes, violins, accordions, 
banjos, fultina and gtiitars. ^^Tlo says the modern 
drtiff store having almost everything but drugs, is 
modern innovation. 

Of course everyone had a garden, but tlie gro- 
cery store was tlie:'c to supplinient the daily diet. 
Sugar could be bought at 14c a pottnd, butter at 30c. 
flour sold for Gc a pound and meat cost ISc. And 
don't thi:.k t;:oy didn't complain. For these prices of 
1S.57 weie a 5C-100 perce:it increase over the cost in 
1S55 v:h2A tJO tr-wn was founded. They shook their 
heads a".:d bought, eve:i as you and I. Undoubtedly 
thoy had the sympathy of their grocery men for 0. 13. 
Cro:by, an operator of one of the stores, always ad- 
vortisjd his motto as, "Fair Play, and no Gouging." 

The community even had the Itixury of a doctor. 
The first one, a Mr. ^Morris, located here, building a 
shanty residence and office on the present site of the 
Eoman Catholic Church. He soon left and was suc- 
ceeded by men who had been practicing in this gen- 
eral area. Dr. Xowlen moved in from Unionville. Dr. 
Taylor of Erie, Dr. Donaldson of Como and Dr. Win- 
ter of ililledgeville. 

On the whole, one cotild describe the medicine 
of the ISSO's as being s^miptomatic medicine. That is, 
the doctors of this time treated the symptoms rather 
than the disease itself. This was necessary since the 
cause of most diseases was unkno-wn. Even malaria, 
though it was usually treated by the administration 
of qtiinine was not understood as a fever caused by the 
infected anophelis mosquito. Blood letting, poultices, 
plasters and emetics were the basic approaches to most 
disorders. One thing which was considered a neces- 
sity in any treatment was keeping the body tracts 
Often. Cathartics were standard treatment, ranging 
from mild purges to what the physicians called dras- 
tics — and they were. For medicines, the doctors re- 
lied upon quinine, mercury, calomel, petroletmi, and 
hundreds of other names which were just as confusing 



to the lay memory as the modern drtigs of today. 

Malaria was a partictilar concern of this area. 
The flood waters of the Mississippi and its tributaries 
acted as great storehouse for "Swamp Fever" as that 
disease was so often called. Dtiring the winter of 1860 
there was quite an epidemic of scarlet fever in north 
western Illinois. Fortunately, Morrison was not af- 
fected, but the newspaper of Jantiary 1, 1S60 suggest- 
ed this as a preventative: "take three teaspoons a day; 
5 grams of extract Belladonna dissolved in -1 grams 
of water." Typhoid fever was another dread occur- 
ance ami apparently many of the early deaths were 
catiscd by this. 

Apparently tooth trotible was something the early 
people of our town just stiffersd with. Dr. Ilollister 
attempted to begin a practice here in .;\pril of 1S59. 
As a beginning he came over from Sterling at least 
one week out of a month. He had hoped to settle here 
permanently in the fall of that year if his btisiness 
warranted. Apparenty there was not enough call for 
his services, althotigh another man began advertising 
that he was available the last week of every month 
beginning in ISGO. 

Dentistry in those days was n^t the joy it is to- 
day. Extractions seemed to be the general approach 
to a diseased tooth and the forcips of that time have 
not really needed to be imj.iroved upon. The extraction 
was made without anesthetics, with perhaps just a 
rinse of whiskey to cleanse the wottnd. Although it 
was a dentist by the name of Long who first tised 
ether in 184:2, and Wells, who used nitrotis oxide in 
1844, the dentists as the doctors, did not make general 
tise of these anesthetics ttntil much later. 

Apparently there was some filling done. The tools 
were all hand operated burrs or drills, picks and chisels. 
The filling itself could be the silver filed from a 
coin, lead or tin melted and poured into the cavity, or 
perhaps gold. In any case, it seems as if the preven- 
tative meastires of dental care and cavity filling were 
neglected tmtil the loss of the tooth was assured. Den- 
ttires, though available, were uncomfortable. They 
wer made of wood, ivory, bone or metals. Often they 
used springs to hold them in place rather than suc- 
tion. Perhaps that is why we so seldom see a smile 
in those early photographs. 

One of the first concerns of any commtmity is 
the edttcation of its children. Morrison did not con- 
struct a school immediately, however. The children 
of this to-wn contintied to use the btiilding and facili- 
ties of the Unionville School. This school had been 
erected in 1847 and was not what one could call ele- 
gant. The btiilding was without a ceiling, with bare 
rafters showing ; slabs were used as benches and rough 
boards were the desks. The room was heated with a 
wood btirning stove. 

By IS.'iG the situation was growing critical with 
a large number of children to be taught. The school 



Compliments Of 

GLENN CRADDOCK 

Real Estate — Loans — Insurance 
Morrison, 111. 


Compliments Of 

BOEREMA'S SHOE STORE 

Shoes For The Entire Family 
And Modern Shoe Repairing 


THE BRICK HOUSE 

402 Lincolnway W. 
Morrison, 111. 

(Formerly Foster Estate) 

Enjoy a Delicious Meal in 
19th Century Atmosphere 

Monday through Friday 
11:15- 1:15 — 5:30 - 7:15 

Sunday Noon 12:00 - 2:00 


TED'S TAP 

Best Spot in Town 

Wine — Liquor — Beer & Sandwiches 

107 W. Main St. 


Compliments Of 

D & I CAFE 

Lunches & Meals 
Grace & Aurelia 


NATIONAL FARM LOAN ASSN. 

Co-operative Farm Loans 

Farm Bureau Bldg. 
Ralph Ketzle, Sec.-Treas. 


Compliments Of 

PAPE'S SUNSET CAFE 

Meals & Short Orders 
Liz Pape Phone 4214 


WHITESIDE SERVICE CO. 

Petroleum & Plant Food 
Morrison, 111. 


Compliments Of 

VAN OSDOL RADIO & T.V. 

403 E. Main St. 
Complete Sales & Service 


Compliments Of 

EAST END COFFEE SHOP 

Home Cooked Meals 
Air Conditioned Florence Kromrey 


Don Ma^^Gw'f 

*# MOnniJoN ILCINOIJ 



house was uiOTed to Morrison in 1S58 ami in addi- 
tiou the rooms of Johnson's hall were nsed. There 
was some disinite as to the site of the new bnilding 
so it was not until ISiiO that a fonr rouni luiilding 
of briek was eonipleted on Morris Street, the same 
propertv now oeetipied bv the present Sunth Side 
Seliool. Professor Kellv was the first jn-ineiplc "f 
this new building. 

A vonngster npon enrollment in tlu' public imIu- 
eation svstem of that dav wonld enter rho priniarv 
department and remain there fiair years taking ouv 
grade eaeh year. Xext eame the intenuediate de])art- 
me.it of two years, a grade eaeh year, then (.irammar 
one grade eompleted in two years ami ar last High 
Sehool whieh was one grade taking four years to 
eomplete. But high selinol edueation was not offer- 
ed until l^l.)^ and even then the first graduating elass 
ia 1>71 eonsisted of only 3 girls. 

The people of Morrison were equally eoneerned 
abotit the establishment of their ehurelies. Almost all 
of them had had eonneetions with the various de- 
nominations back east, so it was natural tiiat they 
continue that interest here. With the beuininuii I'f 



ing so it eould be said they really moved, when they 
had it brought to a site on West Wall street. 

Tliesi' ehurelies repi'esi iited an imjxirtant jiart of 




First Methodist Church 

Ti^iwn life it became more and more feasible to con- 
struct church buildings. The < 'ougregatioual ('hiirch 
was built in T'nionville and met there until Is.'jS when 
tliey decided to move to ^lorrison. The Melhoijists 
and the Presb\'terians and Baptist- aKo nviinwiyA-A 
their churches in Unionville, but ouh- the .Meiliipi|i>i 
built there. The Baptists, organizeij in l^.'i-t, decided 
to build in ^[orrison and thus constructed the first 
church building in Morrison. The Presbyterians, built 
the second church when they moved to the city in Is.'jC. 
The ifethodist decided to change to ^Morrison i.i 
]8oS. Another group of Methodists, .sometimes referr- 
ed to as the Brown Methodists (l/ecause their buihl- 
ing was brownj moved to Morrison in b-^HU. They 
bought the Unionville Congregational church biuhl- 





i^ -'/ 



First Baptist Church 

the life of this early comniuuity. ^lost of the com- 
munity organized theii' entire Stinday aroiuid it, 
iiioruiiig and evening. When a nuiii was thrown frrmi 
a horse ami hurt, hi' i-ecei\e(l ii(_i symi)athy from the 
editui' of the ]ia|ier. lie was riding ou a Sunday, and 
■'thei'efoi'e ought lo he liurt a little.'" Wednesday 
prayer meeting was a must and the Sunday sehool ])ic- 
nic and cdasses wei'e so inipoi'tant as an entertainment 
and educatio.i <>[' the i-hildreii. 1 iirerestingly enough, 
the first Sumlay schodl was a joint school consisting 
of the l!a]iti-t, ( 'i.nui'ejialioiial and Presbyterian peo- 




First Presbyterian Church 

]iii'. This was when llndiaplisl clinrch «'as the (udy 
biuhiiui;'. 



MAURITS INSURANCE AGENCY 

All Forms Of Insurance 
210 N. Genesee St. Morrison, 111. 


SMITH'S 

THE PACKAGE STORE 

Dial 
Whiteside Hotel Bldg. ^^^^ 


ROSSV.BOGOTT 

Plumbing & Heating 
201 N. Genesee St. Morrison, 111. 


ELITE BEAUTY STUDIO 

211 Lincolnway East 

Dial 3514 

Helen Rosenow Morrison, 111. 


Q. R. SLY, D.C. 

219 E. Main 
Morrison, Illinois 


THE HOBBY & CRAFT SHOP 

Art & Craft Supplies 
207 E. Main St. Morrison, 111. 


BLANCHE BEAUTY SHOPPE 

406 W. Main St. 

Dial 3413 

Blanche Frederick Morrison, 111. 


CARNATION COMPANY 

Milk From Contented Cows 
Morrison, 111. 


BASILE'S LIQUOR STORE 

123 W. Main St. — Morrison 
Phone 4653 


THE WHITESIDE COUNTY NEWS 

Published Mondays and Thursdays 
Morrison, 111. 


MARGARET A. PAULUN, D.C. 

IIOE. North St. 

Morrison, 111. 

Phone 4760 


KINSEL CLINIC 

300 No. Ba.se St. Dial 2G14 Morrison, 111. 

O. A. KINSEL L. D. KINSEL 
Naprapath Chiropractor 



The women of the ehnrohe? were as busy as ever. 
They gave dinners and tea?. Yonng people attended 
the soeials and enjoyed themselves eating ice cream 
and stealing glances at each other. The newspaper of 
Jnly :27, l>oS had this to say abont one such evi'ut 
at the Baptist chtirch : ""The yonng men for whtnn 
we declined to promise, K'haved better than we ex- 
pected, and the ladies were killiu' sweet." Boys will 
be boys and isn't it wonderful alxnit these who are 
"killin" sweet" ' 

Perhaps we might think the sternness id' those 
early chttrch men somewhat strange, but then the 
chtirch was serious business. Each member felt him- 
self to be a witness for something greater than him- 
self. His conduct, deportment was therefore crucial. 

With the developiment of all these activities and 
with the settlement of all these jjeoije within the 
boimds of ^lorrison it is to be expected that a city ad- 
ministration had to be formed. Consequently an elec- 
tion was held April S, ISoT and with 17 voting in 
favor for incorporation and ony two against, the 
action was assured. On April i!.")th, S. II. Vroom, S. 
H. McCrea, Lyman Johnson, J. G. Gridley and Wm. 
Coe were eleeted trustees. Hiram Olmstead was select- 
ed to be police magistrate. 

Their first official action taken on June 3rd was 
to fix the boundaries of the town, to prohibit swine 
from running at large in the community, assess four 
days of work on the roads and streets for every in- 
habitant between the ages of 21 and 50, levy a tax 
on property, provide a fine for iJeoi^le selling liquor 
in an^T:hing less than one gallon without a license, 
and forbid billiards and other nusiance games within 
the city limits. 

The streets were also a special concern. A rain 
of any amount turned them into mtiddy streams. The 
WTiiteside Sentinel carried on a vigorous campaign 
of criticism and suggestion and finally sticceeded in 
moving the people to install wooden sidewalks at least 
along the downtown streets. 

Water was also a problem, and had Ijeen froiii 
the very beginning of the town. Xnt being located nn 
a stream, the city had to rely on wells and cistern to 
supply its needs. It ^\ould not be till 1S6S that the 
city fathers would solve this problem by a deep well 
bored to a depth of 1,200 feet. This water rose natttral- 
ly to within 20 feet of the surface and was pum]X'(i 
from that level by a large windmill. Tor a time it 
was stored in a large 90,000 gallon tank. When it 
burst in 1S74. a flood was caused that did much dam- 
age. 

The city administration also saw to the erec- 
tion of a jail house. One of the penalties of tiie I'ail- 
road was the movement of undesirables through tiic 
city. Crime during the time of the pioneers and early 
.settlers was almost non-existent. But from 185.5 on, 
more and more legal violations were reported. Horse 



stealing liecame quite common, breaking and enter- 
ing was reported several times a month. Drunken peo- 
]de, usually male, btit sometimes, females were thrown 
off the train only to find their way into the jail that 
was finally constructed in 1S5S. The nuijority of a 
imtoridus l)and of counterfeiters were the first occu- 
pants. Indeed, the merchants had to be on a constant 
look out for bogus bills, for counterfeiting was very 
much th<' iiractice in those days. 

When the circuit court met on January 1, ISGO 
this was its docket : 9 cases of larceny, 2 robbery, -t 
forgery, 5 cotinterfeit money, 27 selling liqttor with- 
out a license, 2 gambling, 1 mayhem, 1 arson, 2 as- 
sault. Lif(> was becDining complicated in otir com- 
ininiity. 

riic local ne\vspa])er had an interesting method 
of dealing with those who ordered the paper and after 
receiving it for several months left town without pay- 
ment. They would print their names in the paper 
and would refer to them in terms such as these. 

"We enroll another list of scamps. We have read 
of a great many acts of scoundrelism and petty 
thieving but cm- list below exhibits a shade lower 
grade of rascality than is aspired to by the regularly 
initiated in this class of business." 

Whiteside Sentinel, 3-15-60 

One of the dvantages of the community life of 
a town was that people might associate more in their 
leisure activities, and give their sujiport to associa- 
tions of a more cultural nature. This is exactly what 
happeneil in ^lorrisou. 

On .lidy 2;!rd, 1S57, the first issue cd' the White- 
side Sentinel was published. The citizens oi this com- 
munity had in\ited ^[r. Alfred ^IcFadden, a publisher 
acti\'(' in Fulton to come to ^lorrison and begin this 
l)aiX'r which they felt was iieedi>d. This paper was 
finally bought by .Mi', (hares Bent in 1870 who in 
turn sold it to Mv. R. W. Welch in 1877. From its 
beginning it was identified as a Republican paper, and 
tiiose were the days when that party was jtist coming 
into existence. 

But the paper was much more than what we 
might think it to be today. It was the novel, the re- 
jiorter, the text book of lutndreds of subjects. We can 
discover that by just looking at one of the early publi- 
cations. 

The first ]K(ge almost never contained local news. 

It was usmtly devoted to literature. The issue of 
September 1, 1857, for example began a story entitl- 
ed, "Lillie Stanhope, of Love and WillfuUness." It 
was really literature in a high key. It began: "A 
bright beautiful morning was it in the perfttme laden 
June, and woodbine cottage looked more than ever as 
thotigh it were the offspring of some magical wand 
whose — ", and so on the first sentence goes for most 
of the first page. 

'i'lieii, too, the first ]iage contained facts for the 
curicnH sticli as, the ages of the presidents at death, — 
the philosnpliy of ciMtrtiug — jokes such as, ''Why 



SHELL SERVICE STATION 

Elmer Meyerhoff, Prop. 
Morrison. 111. 

Tires — Polishing — Batteries 


KEN & FRED 
SINCLAIR STATION 

Gasoline — Tires 

and Accessories 

Phone 2993 


— -TRIIVFS— - — 


STRALOW HARDWARE 

Appliances 

Housewares 

Complete Line of Hardware 

Phone 2314 




F« 


H 


)DiIlin)STORES 


-WHERE PRICE TELLS & QUALITY SEl LS" 


ALWAYS BETTER BUYS 
AT 

GAMBLES 

Bulk Gas — Furnaces 
Appliances — Hardware 


DON'S WHITESIDE SERVICE 

Tires — Batteries — Service 
Cooper Power Mowers 

Phone 4111 


Maedge's Clover Farm Store 

Groceries — Meats — Fruits — Vegetables 

209 West Main St. 

DIAL 3117 

Morrison, 111. 


Drink 
Sun Crest Orange 

and 
Mason's Root Beer 

DR. PEPPER BOTTLING CO. 

Clinton, Iowa 


HENRY BEYEROTH 
Texaco Petroleum Products 

Havoline Motor Oil 

Marfk Lubrication and Washing 

Goodrich Tires and Accessories 

DIAL 3314 

Lincolnway and Orange St. 


RENKES PAINT STORE 

Paint — Floor Coverings 
Draperies — Wallpaper 

Morrison, 111. 


BROWN LYNCH SCOTT 

Housewares — Appliances 
Hardware 

Morrison, Illinois 


Open 8 to 6:00 Mon. Thru Thursday. 
8 to 9 Fri. and Sat. 

BEGGS 

Certified Cash & Carry 

Groceries, Meats 

Save Every Day The Certified Way — DIAL 3411 



is a mill like a shoe I Because it grinds corn." 

The second page was local editorials or national 
news along with advertisements, lu this issue, the 
cause for alarm was an editorial against the people of 
Sterling who wanted to get the LVuiuty Seat nmved 
back to Sterling. There was also a report of scandal 
in Xew York high society. A body had been discover- 
ed buried in the sand of someone's estate — , and so 
on. 

The third page was almost all ad\ertisenients, 
e.xcept for one eohtmn which contained most of the 
local news and opinions of the editor. "The bridge 
across the Kock Creek at L'nionville was almost fall- 
ing down — a report on the wheat crop, 775,000 
bushels had been shipped, the sheriff was applauded 
for the capture of a thief and forger. 'In doing this, 
he showed Skill and Sagacity'." But at the bottom 
of the paper, this was given a P. S. "Since this was 
in type, the prisoner while on the way from .Morri- 
son to Madison escaped and is still at large." There 
was no further comment. 

The last page, was almost all ads, most of them 
rejieats of page three, but occasionally there was a re- 
port such as atrocity to women in far off India, or a 
de-eriptioii of hay mowing time in Xew England. 

Thus we can see, that the newspaper was first 
and foremost a means of information and enlight- 
ment rather than news. As such it was an important 
aspect of the development of culture on the frontier 
of the 1850's. 

As a matter of fact, it was during this time that 
a tremendous interest in learning developed. Of course, 
there was the public school for the children, but it was 
felt that something had to be developed for the adult. 
The Lyceum was one such answer. 

The Morrison Lyceum, a debating society, was 
organized in the winter of 1859, largely throtigh the 
efforts of the local paper and lawyers. They met once 
a week, having regulary scheduled debates and dis- 
cussions, which were organized upon the basis of two 
arguing for a jJi'oposition, and two against. In this 
manner many important and interesting subjects were 
brought before the people of the community. The 
first debate was on this topic: "Resolved: that we 
sh'ould desire and encourage a sectional party." An- 
other was on "mob rule." It can be said that all the 
major problems which were tiltimately involved in 
the war between the states were argtied and discussed 
in such meetings as this, and therefore had mttcb to 
do with the united stand the Xorthcrii States were 
destined to take. 

For those who did not want to take jiart in the 
give and take of debates there were many .series of 
lectures. Traveling lecttirers were always making one 
or two night .stands in our community. Sometimes 
this lecture would be baaed upon the political issties 
of the day. In December, 1859, the Honorable E. 



Graham presented the topic, ''John Brown's Invasion 
and Slavery." He had known Brown in Kansas and 
liiid been present at some of the violent incidents there. 
Other lectures would cover tlie field of many dif- 
ferent subjects. The Kev. 0. D. Simmons lectured 
oil "Spiritualism," and "Romanism and Slavery." 
.Mrs. llcloii .Maidiam gave a iiresentatiou on Ana- 
tomy and Physiology, wliieli, tliough advertised as 
"a science" was luidoubtedly considered by many as 
ris(|ne and scandalous. 

( )f course the local ministers were always on hand 
for ibis type of educational program. Once when a 
brick mason, Tlioinas Whitaker, fell off a scaffolding 
at the l>a])tist ('liurch and broke his leg, Mr. Lackey, 
the Presbyterian minister was asked to present a lec- 
ture. The free will offering was to help support Mrs. 
Wliitaker. His subject, "Wit and Humor." 

In addition to these debates and lectures, the 
traveling shows were always invading Morrison. One 
Family show of music, dancing and skits was especial- 
ly enjoyable to early Morris(Uiites. Apparently, they 
had been here many times for in February, 1861, 
all the paper said was, "The Bakers are back." For 
an earlier performance of this family in '59, it was 
re])orteil that I lie concert ball was filled by "an in- 
telligent aiKJ aii]ireciative audience at an early^ hour.'' 

.Villi, (d' course, there were the circuses. The year 
lN(i() was a great oc<'asion foi' the young and the young 
at h(>ai't. There were two oi them. In August Dellaven's 
Great Union ("ircus came to town with its parade and 
setting u]) of great tents, but it was only a taste of 
what was to come. Fi>r on September 1st, Antonio 
Bros, came glittering into town with horse riders, acro- 
bats, clowns, and a "Triumpiial Procession." The fea- 
ture attraction was "The Fire King," a man who would 
be enveloi)ed by fire. "Hot stuff," even in those days. 

Althougii every day was not a circus and life 
was still not leisundy and without its difficulties, 
the jieojile of .Morrison could find many enjoyable 
pursuits. The winter of 1858 saw the beginning of a 
series of so called "Socialables" where in "the dance" 
the yotuig gents had an opportunity to demonstrate 
their strength and enthusiasm and the shy, young 
maidens their grace. Such "goings on" provoked some 
oi)positiou but not enough to bring it to a halt. These 
dances were held in the Odd Fellow's Hall and were 
by invitation only. .Viiyone could receive an invita- 
tion, for tlie iie\vs])a])cr in reporting on this suggested, 
"It becomes all who are invited to s<'e that none of 
their friends are overlooked." 

Then too, there was always the possibility of get- 
ting a grouj) <d' friends together and having a picnic, 
an excursion on the train, or a sleigh ride. One such 
j)arty is reported to have taken ))lace January 1, 18fiO. 
The i)eople rode their sleighs to Seeley's Inn over at 
Portland, and there had had a tremendous meal. "Oy- 
sters, mince pies, and one-half dozen kinds of cake," 



BUILDING MATERIAL — FEED 
COAL — GRAIN — HARDWARE 

If You Want It To 
Last 100 Years— 

DIAL 
4112 

J. A. BULL & SONS 

See You In 2055! 



MILLS MOTOR SALES CO. 

Ford Products 

Phone 4114 Morrison, 111. 



The CLIMCO Company 

Manufacturers Of Electrical Coils 

111 West Market Street 
Morrison, Illinois 

Phone 4516 



T. M. Klimstra 



A. W. Collins 



FOREST INN 

Fine Food — Cocktails 



Phone 3996 



Air Conditioned 



A. W. Badger Lumber Co. 

Good Lumber and Good Coal 
For Over 45 Years 

DIAL 2312 



KIMMEL MOTOR SALES 

Studebaker and Packard 
Sales and Service 



Dial 3997 



206 W. Main 



COL. CARL A. HAMMER 

Auctioneer 
Over 2700 Sales Since 1918 
Holds a Record at Selling 
181 Articles in 55 Minutes 



Tlu'ii "rhev soon joiiu'd luuuls to [lavtako of the ex- 
hiliaratiug pleasure of the danoe." and to "trip it ou 
the light fautastie." 

It is difficult to determine exactly what type of 
spirts the youug people or adults engaged in during 
these years. The only one reported is one which you 
would never guess. iMiU'rison, believe it ov noi, was tlu' 
proud Ixuister of a Cricket I'luh. How this Knglish 
game managed to lift its wicket head here in the 
Mid- West is your guess, but June 2S. KstiO saw the 
Morrison Cricket Chib entrained for Lyons. Iowa, and 
a full day of standing to the bat. Ajiparently. they ale 
mere than they jdayed what with lunch an<l dinnei' 
heiue on the program of the day. hJiU the Morrison 
"eleven" came home victorious. They iK'at Lyons, 1(m; 
wickets to ~'2. The return was a triumiihani bearing of 
the "Trophy." a new cricket ball. 

Such then was life in early .Morrison. In its tirst 
fev»- years it showed all the marks of a thriving, de- 
veloping community. Politically, culturally, socially, it 
was awake and active. Thus when the first settler with- 
in the town site of Morrison, John Stakes, died in 
l>iil, a tremendous transformation had taken place. 
It was he who was the first to know these acres. When 
he forced that first plottgh through the tough ju-airii' 
sod he was the first to begin the transformation of 
what was created by nature into something created hy 
man. Looking around the community which had 
sprang into existence within his last five years of life, 
how amazed he must have been at the transformation 
which had taken place. How amazed he would be with 
that further transformation which we now accept so 
casually as the Morrison of 1955. For he had seen 
only the initiating steps. So mttch more was to follow. 

THE DEVELOPMEXT OF MORRISON 

It is always difficult to present the many change," 
that are a part of community life, but more and more 
we of America have come to accept progress as im- 
provement, and improvement as inevitable. Looking at 
our ovra situation here in Morrison, and comparing it 
to the city in its fotmding years we can certainly be 
aware of such improvement and progress. 

Xothing can be more diffictilt than attem])ting 
to interpret this 100 years of history in the sjjace 
of a few pages. In order that we may do this in the 
form of a survey, let us take trans])ortation as our 
frame of reference. That is, let us take the mo(h' of 
travel as the key to otir interpretation and scan oni' 
history in that liglit. This is fitting, since it was tbe 
coming of the railroad, which signalleil the beginniim 
of our history as a town. 

During the early ]>i<)U's, almost all activity as 
far as development halted. The nation was involved 
in a Civil War which was to decide the very basis of 
our governmental organization. Hardly had Fort 
Sumter surrendered when there was an enthusiastic 



response from the people of Morrison. In a series of 
nu'ctings in April, 1S(!1, the conuuunity made a strong 
witness for the Federal form of government, free- 
dom (d' the shnes and the support of President Lin- 
coln. Lcd'orc the news was cold. Captain George E. 
( 'ole had formed a comi)any which was immediately 
accejited for service by Gov. Gates. The city even col- 
lected money to siijiport these soldiers until the time 
I hey might be on government pay. Another group of 
men organized into the "Whiteside Blues," a second 
rifle company. II. W. Bristol was elected to be caj)- 
lain. I'nder ( 'aptain K. U. (^lendenuin, a troop of 
i-al\"ary was ready foi- dtity under the name of "The 
Whiteside Rangt'l's." 

For th(.' next five years the yotuig men of our 
area would be away at war and the people at home 
would be active in their support. 

Following the Civil War the growth of Morri- 
son continued. In ISfiT the city was incorporated, but 
not without confusion. The state legislature had passed 
a bill authorizing incorporation but in the local elec- 
tion there were two different parties, the "Charter 
ticket" and the "anti-charter ticket." Those who op- 
poseil the incorporation of Morrison w'ere elected — 
but thiy were supposedly elected to form a city govern- 
ment which they ran not to form. As you might gtiess, 
the circuit cotirt was asked to settle it, and after still 
more confusion, they decided that there was no city 
government elected. It was just as well, because the 
oi'iginal charter had us listed for Range four and not 
five, pacing us officially and legally, right in the mid- 
dle of the cattail slough 7 miles west of here. 

All of this was finally corrected in another elec- 
tion atithorized in 1869, and the charter of incorpora- 
tion was adopted with an overwhelming vote. Mr. 
(reorge A. Whitcomb was elected as the first mayor. 

During all this time, the two means of trans- 
portation upon which the city depended was the rail- 
road and the horse drawn vehicle. Since the railroad 
was concerned mainly with the hauling of grain, we 
(•ould say that both were therefore closely coimected 
1(1 the agricultural concern of the people in the area 
surrounding ^lorrison. Indeed the btisiness of Mor- 
rison was organized arotind these modes of transporta- 
tion. Idle surge of business activity which took place 
ill tlie "70"s reflected this. In 1871 the Morrison Car- 
I'iage woi'ks was begttn, occujjying a large plant on 
the cornel' of West .Main and Ihise. They produced a 
line carriage and wagon from materials brought to 
Morrison by the railroad. The hickory of the frame 
and body, for exam]de, came from Ohio. The Agri- 
cnltui-al works, another early industry, also reflected 
the sanu^ situation. Founded in 1873 it produced the 
"Morrison Wagon," the "Morrison Stalk Cutter," aiid 
the ".Morrison Hob Sled." K. !'. Goodenough and 
Mellersted also were in the buggy and wagon repair 
service, in tliose days, all of the pieces of equipment 



were niaile using hand operated tools. The fact tliat 
we sujjported 5 harness shops, 6 implement and hard- 
ware stores, 3 livery barns, and 3 stock buyers is per- 
haps an indication of how important the horse and 
liuagv was to Morrison. The monthly horse sales which 
were held from "^li to "92 sold over 1,000 horses and 
sometimes as many as 100 a day wonld exchange hands. 

It was (hiring this time that our city grew in the 
necessary services that a town must have, and likes 
t.i have. The more business activity and industry that 
develiqied. the greater the need for banking facilities. 
The first bank in Murrison was conseqtiently founded 
in lN(i3 ly .Mr. Styles and Mr. A. T. Jacksi>n. The next 
year Styles retired and Leander Smith, a lianker ami 
Imnlier dealer of Fulton, went iiitu iiartnership with 
■A Mr. Mc-Kay from Mt. Carndl. It was this bank that 
came under the management of K. .V. Smith in ISM). 

Like so many of the early banks, these were pri- 
\-ate ciincerns. They were without federal control, and 
as Mr. K. A. Smith explains, to start a liaid-; in tln.ise 
(lavs, all \ou had to do was hang out a shingle. But 
The Smith Trust and Savings Bank cea.sed to function 
as a private institution when it was incori)orated in 
IHI.") under state law. It is since become a member 
of the Federal Reserve Banking System. 

As the city grew, the city had t(5 improve its 
water system. Fire plugs were installiHl throughout 
the downtown area, and motor driven jnimjis were 
used. A privat(\ Volunteer fire department was fcu'm- 
ed ill 1^7|■l. It was not only a mark of distinction to 
belong to this organization, it was also a business. The 
local firms would pay for its ]irotection and possible 
services and sometimes a fee was received for its work. 
Its first fire was at the jail house which was then on 
^Tni;! Street. One jirisoner lost his life. 

Another sign of the growth of our community wa- 
the fact that the cemetery had to be enlarged. When 
the first ileath occurred in 1856, that of Mrs. IJ. (). 
linssell there Were ludy twenty families in town and 
no thought had been given to this concern that e\ery 
conununity faces. When Lyman .Tohns(jn and A. J. 
Jackson started off on a rainy day to choose this first 
burial site they had no definite idea in mind Init they 
made their way north through the oak scrub and finally 
seleete(l a |)lace high on a ridge north of town. ISy 
lM!n there had been many btirials btit the grounds 
were so neglecte(l that the newspaper almost insisteil 
that all of the towns jieople give up a part of a day 
to bring the grass and weeds and scrtdj growth under 
Control. By ls7.") it was necessary to add the eastern 
anil northern portions. The lieauty and quiet ajtpeal 
of this place is known to all in this area. 

Xot wanting to be outdone by the stirroundim: 
connnunities, a ]iark association was formed in 1^71. 
Its aim was to promote horse racing only, ami in its 
first meeting offered purses totaling !(;Ltt."i.").(H). The 
next vcar this oriianization was chaniied to the Whiti- 



side County Agricultural Association. It established 
itself on the site ijf the present fair grounds and has 
since developed into (.mr county fair. In the beginning- 
it consisted of a race track, amphitheatre, stock sheds 
and one central building. A log cabin was built there 
in ISN.-. by the OLD SETTLER'S ASSOCTATIOX. 
Each of these families brought one log from the tim- 
ber wdiere they honiesteaded and Iniilt the cabin. It 
has since been taken down because of deterioration. 

Although the horse still was the means of loco- 
miition and ]iower, the carriage and wag'on works be- 
<j,an to go out of business in the 'SO's. It was the rail- 
road that helped this. I'or on its flat cars, hundreds of 
buggies and wagons would be shipped in from, central 
jioints of nuiss production and they woitld be lined 
along the streets. Hand craft could not compete, so 
changes were being forced upon the commtinity. 

Other technological improvements were on their 
way in the 'SO's. By iss9, II. S. Green had foriued the 
electric light company, the streets began to be lighted 
bv electricity. The first tidephone line was run into 
Morrison from Sterling in TS^l. And the people not 
only had -something to talk about, but also to talk 
thru, 'idle tfdegraph had been in operation since '5S 
so ^lorrison was in direct commttnication with the rest 
of the Country by wire as well as by rail. 

Beginning in the b'-iint's a different emphasis of 
industry de\-elo])ed. Instead <if industry and business 
hinged to local markets, enterprises developed wdiicli 
could take advantage ni the railroad and ship its prod- 
ucts to other markets. The Davis greenhouse which be- 
iiaii as a floral business became a hot house indttstry 
for vegetable ])roduetion, particularly cucumbers. 
Taken over by J. ^^'. Steiner in 1899 his business was 
developed until its buildings covered a substantial ]iart 
of the south east corner of town. 

A refrigerator factory also began at this time, and 
grew to be such an important part of the city's economy 
that bv 19:2-1- it provided employment for 12-1: men 
an.l had a monthly wage pa^•ment of $192,000.00. 

Other factories tVdlowed. The Libby Condensing 
factory was started in 190i;. 1!)U saw the start of a 
stove factory, and in liii's. tiys were produced in a 
portion of the refrigeration plant. 

The turn of the centuiy- saw the advent of the 
automobile, a device which was to radicallv change 
the life id' eveiyone and eveiy town. Frank VanOsdol 
owned the second car in town and by r.il2, there 
were enough of these horseless carriages around to 
support a garage. One pioneer of the gas buggy made 
the 22 mile tri]) from Tampico to Morrison in 190.'). 
lie must have covercil the distance with no breakdowns, 
fov he made it in a whizzing time of one hour and 
twenty minutes. 

There were so many of these contraptions on the 
road by IHI.'!, that the dream of a transcontinental 
hiiihwav was beniiinin-;' to move the thouohts and ac- 



tioiis of the people of the United State*. 1920 #a\v this 
rond completed along- it# total o.oSi> miles. IMorri- 
soii was never going to be the same. Thvongli the 
twenties one gas station after another sprang up along 
the Liueolnwav as Grove Street was now ealled. Gar- 
ages and automobile salesrooms replaced the bnggy 
shops. And one dirt road after another \vas hard sur- 
faced and paved ttntil in the mid-thirties it seemed 
impossible that the main roads out of ilorrison could 
have ever been mttddy and impassable. 

One of the (.nttstanding instittttions of ^torrison 
was founded in 1>77 as the Historical and Geological 
So.'iery. Beginning with an interest in museum speci- 
mens and books, the financial backing of J. D. Odell, 
and the contintted interest and support of the com- 
munity, this service has expanded to become the Free 
Public Library of today, ^^^len the Congregational 
Cl.urch building was offered for sale it was ptirehas- 
ed in 1SS7 by Mr. Odell and given to the society. This 
building has continued to house the city's collection 
of books, being remodeled and expanded in 1934 to 
house an ever growing collection. It is a sotirce oi 
knowledge, pleasttre and satisfaction for all wlm 
wiMild use its srvices. 

As one could expect in a growing community the 
school system had all it could do to keep up with en- 
riillment presstires. By 1895 there were so many chil- 
dren that the Xorthside school had to be added to 
the facilities. A fire in 1907 at the Southside school 
complicated matter but good insurance adjustments 
helped ease the problem. A south wing built to house 
the high school was an added answer to the sittiation 
just before the first World War. The recently com- 
pleted Community High School represents another 
stage in the long procession of btiilding programs tn 
meet the constantly increasing demands that have al- 
ways been put upon the public Edticational program. 
Its beautiful and functional rooms have become a tre- 
raendotis asset, not nuly to the schools of ilorrison, bttt 
to the city itself. 

Certainly the churches of any commttnity s])eak 
of the aspirations and faith of its peojile. Anyone 
driving into our city cannot help but be amazed and 
impressed at all those signs signifying the presence of 
twelve churches. Of those churches, three were present 
at the beginning of our history, the Methodists, Bap- 
tists and Presbyterians. The others have developed 
since that time. The Roman Catholics established their 
first building in 1862 around a small group of worship- 
pers. It has grown into its large and active congrega- 
tion through the years, and has recently celebrated 
the fiftieth anniversary of having installed pastor. St. 
Ann's Episcopal Church began with a group id' Eng- 
lish and Scotch settlers during the Civil War. Tliey 
were readv to erect their church buildiiiii' bv Iss-t 



aiid liaxc used this same building ever since. Its style 
and design i^ still pleasing and tisefttl even in this 
eleetniuic age. 

lieflecting the arrival ef the peoples of Holland 
and Germany in America dttring the latter part of 
the llttli eenturv, lu'w ehttrches were organized around 
that time. The i-'.lienezer Kefiirmed Church was form- 
ed in l^'.H'i. nieeiing at first in a cotintry school house 
and later nmving to ]\Iorrison. Their 1920 building 
whieh re]ilaeil the "first Wliite ( 'iuireli," was remodel- j 

(mI into I he [ireseiU large and beatitifttl structure in 
WKiU, The Ijethesda Lutheran Church was also or- 
ganizeil in the late 90's, and they erected their build- 
ing in l^',i>. This group has just recently purchased a 
new manse. The German Littheran Church, St. Pet- 
er's, moved into the city in 1913, having been in exist- 
ence as a rural church f(n- many years. They have 
contintieil tn grow and make imi^rovements on their 
]U'operty thrnmih all these intervening years. 

In 111 Hi the ( 'hristian Science grottp, who had 
been meeting in tenijxirary qtuirters erected their o\^'n 
lovely building. 

l'.)-"i."i saw a new chttrch being formed. Starting 
i:i a half l)\iih]ing. the Christian Reformed Church 
Ijegan to develop its ministry within the city of Mor- j 
rison. It has not been too long ago that they coniT 1 
pletod their fiiu^ sanctuary. Other new churches have 
lieen the Emmanuel Keformed, a sister church of the 
other Reformed Communion, in 1947, and most re- 
cently, the Bible Baptist Church. 

All id' these chtirches have served the people of 
.Miirrisiin. have existed through the stipport of the 
])eople of ^lorrison. All of them have added some- 
thing to the life of the commtmity which is irreplac- 
able^ 

There is so much more that must be said but 
cannot be said : xlthletics, for example, such as the 
Morrison Regulars, the basketball team of the early 19 
litmdreds ; the bttsinesses that have developed and flour- 
ished ; the social clubs ; the civic grotips ; the 'S^'^eteran's 
Organizations; the things people do. their interests, 
tlieir concerns. One look at the classified directory of 
the Tidephnne IJnok reveals how our living has chang- 
ed even within the ]iast ten years. 

But this iniich is certain, even as Morrison exists 
ia a laml "f treineinhms possibilities, so will those 
]iossibilities he refleeteil within the life of its peoples. i 

The whole history of this town indicates its increas- 
ing interdependence itpon areas outside its own bounds, 
beginning with tlie agricultural pursuits of its im- 
mediate envirniis, to the electronic concerns of a dis- 
tant laboratory. The lesson of our history is that we 
do not exist to oiu'selves alone, we are part of some- 
tliing greater and we share in that greatness: ^Iprri- 
son, I'nited States of America. World. 



Compliments 

COZY CORNER CAFE 

Featuring Home Cooked Meals 
129 E. Main Agnes & Mert Crump 



Compliments Of 

TOLBERT REFRIGERATION 

Sales & Service 

Fedder's & York Air Conditioners 

Phone 3404 



Watches — Clocks — Diamonds 

Silverware 

Gifts 

NELSON JEWELRY STORE 



Compliments Of 

THE SPOT TAVERN 

Wines — Beers — Liquors 
125 W. Main Morrison 

WHITESIDE CO-OPERATIVE 
LOCKER SERVICE 



Morrison 

Prophetstown 

Sterling 



Erie 

Coleta 

Tampico 



STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS 
Richard Langley 

Morrison, 111. 



Compliments Of 

MOLLY'S TAVERN 

Where Friends Meet For Centennial 
201 E. Main 



MT. PLEASANT MUTUAL 
FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

1041/2 E. Main Morrison, 111. 

Established 1872 



Over Half A Century 

Of Service To Morrison 

and Surrounding Community 




Compliments Of 

WHITESIDE COUNTY 
HOME BUREAU 

Your Home Is What You Make It 



Courtesy Of 

CAPITOL THEATRE 




Earliest Known Picture of Morrison's Main Street, Taken in 1870 




EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE of Morrison Centennial telcbi alion. Seated left to right, J. H. McDuffie, 
vice-chairman; Willard Nelson, W. E. Beck, chairman: Leslie Janke. Standmg, Rov Lange, L. C. An- 
derson, Fred Holt and Don Mathew. 



LUELLx'V'S DRESS SHOP 

Ladies Ready-to-Wear and Accessories 

Luella Armstrong 

Morrison, 111. 


JOE'S SMOKE HOUSE 

Smoker's Needs — Liquors 

Papers — Ice Cream 

PHONE 2216 

Joe Gallentine, Prop — We Deliver 


98 Years of Service to Morrison 
and Whiteside County 

THE WHITESIDE SENTINEL 

with the Largest City and Rural 

Circulation of any Semi-Weekly 

or Weekly in the County. 


MAGIC MIRROR BEAUTY SALON 

"Beauty Is Our Business" 

Wilma Broughton 
Phone 4202 Morrison, 111. 


THE WHITESIDE HOTEL 

Proprietor 
C. D. O'Harrow Morrison, 111. 


The Morrison Steam Laundry 

"Let Our Phone Line Be Your Clothes Line" 
PHONE 2911 


KeM APPAREL SHOP 

Tena M. Klimstra — Marguerite Van Osdol 

READY-TO-WEAR AND ACCESSORIES 

102 West Main Street Morrison. Illinois 


New-Modern 

HILLCREST MOTEL 

Located East Edge City Limits on U. S. 30 
MORRISON, ILLINOIS 
Open Year 'round 

Phone 2430 Phyllis and Warren Cant 


HILLTOP LANES 

Bowl For Health 

E. Lincolnway - Morrison 

Al and Goldie Dixon 


Compliments Of 

KEITH E. KNOX 

D-X Petroleum Products 
Phone 3815 Morrison 


Production Credit Association 

A Farmed-Owned Lending Institution 
Servicing Lee and Wliiteside Counties 

Offices in Morrison and Dixon 


V. F. W. 

Members and Friends 

Visit Our Air-Conditioned Club 

Refreshments and Sandwiches 

208 E. Main St. 



Compliments Of 

RALPH DOMDEY 

Genei^al Contractors 
Cement Work Electric Wirina 

EDWIN C. MEINERS. Contractor 

Cabinet Work and Remodelling 
A Specialty. 

Dial 3593 



A. J. EBBERS & SONS 

Phone 4370 

General Contracting 

and 

Cabinet Work 



LOUIS SHAMBAUGH 

General Contractor 

Phone 3781 

Residential Building a Specialty 



Traums Plumbing & Repair 

Plumbing and Heating 
Fixtures Supplies 



Admiral 
Refrigerators 



Whirlpool 
Washers 



Dial 4740 



Congratulations - - - Morrison! 



NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY 



Volckman Furniture Mfg. Co. 

Manufacturers of Upholstered Furniture 

Morrison, Illinois 



CLYDE GROHARING 

Phone 3417 
Mason Contractor 





American Air Filter 

erman nelson 



r m a n n 

o,v,s,o. 
MOLINE I 




POTTER BROS., INC. 

Building Materials — Millwork 

Hardware — Coal — Fuel Oil 

Since 1879 

Dial 2912 101 W. Market 



READY TO WEAR DRY GOODS 
CHILDREN'S WEAR NOTIONS 
INFANTS' WEAR GIFTS 

TDULV A COOO' CTOm 


ILLINOIS 


McMASTER'S JEWELERS 

Finest In Jewelry and Gifts 
115 E. Main St. Phone 4118 


Compliments Of 

BURN'S LUNCHEONETTE 

Morrison, Illinois 


Comphments Of 

HURLEY'S TAVERN 

Morrison, 111. Phone 3915 
Owners; Dick and Pat Hurley 


Compliments Of 

SANDROCK'S JEWELRY 

Watches and Diamonds 


Courtesy Of 

VAN'S YOUTH FASHIONS 

Complete Apparel For Children 


Comphments Of 

FRITZ'S TAVERN 

A Friendly Place To Meet Your Friends 


Compliments Of 

SAM WRIGHT'S 
Shoe Store 



COMMITTEES 

-IDMINISTKATIVE DIVISION W. E. Beck, Jr., Chairman 

James H. INIcDuffie. Co-Chairman 

FINANCE DIVISION .Fred H. Holt, Chairman 

Underwriting Committee H. V. Pittenger, Chairman 

Novelties Committee Ross Bealer, Chairman 

Beard Contest Committee Bob Collins, Chairman 

Historical Program Committee A. M. Potter, Chairman 

Official Hat Committee Ross Bealer, Chairman 

Concessions Committee Ross Bealer. Chairman 

Decorations Committee A. W. Collins, Chairman 

Sisters of the Swish Committee Mrs. Robert Tracy, Chairman 

SPECTACLE TICKET DIVISION L. C. Anderson, Chairman 

Advance Ticket Committee Vern Renkes, Chairman 

Gate & Ushers Committee .Stuart Blean, Chairman 

Queen Contest Committee Burdette Curtis, Chairman 

Reserve Seat Committee P. J. Buikenia, Chairman 

PUBLICITY DIVISION Roy Lange, Chairman 

Press Committee Al Shawver, Chairman 

Radio Committee Larry Ewers, Chairman 

Promotional Committee M. G. Matthews & Andy Brands, Chairmen 

Distributive Committee — S. F. Long, Chairman 

Speakers Committee Ralph Ketzle, Chairman 

SPECTACLE DIVISION Les Janke, Chairman 

Cast Committee . Wilma Lucas & Alberta Jackson, Chairmen 

Costume & Make-Up Committee Gladys Ludens & Gladys Smith, Chairmen 

Construction Committee Burton Shambaugh, Chairman 

Scenario & Title Committee Alene Haines, Chairman 

Properties Committee Bob Bull & Doris Butcher, Chairmen 

Spectacle Music Committee Annette Rich & Nancy Nelson, Chairmen 

SPECIAL EVENTS DIVISION Willard Nelson, Chairman 

Parade Committee Karl Yost, Chairman 

Celebration Ball Committee J. M. Holland, Chairman 

Historical Window Committee T. M. Whitemore, Chairman 

Fireworks Committee Gene Nelson, Chairman 

Special Days Committee L. Willard Nelson, Chairman 

Religious Day Ministerial Association 

Patriotic Day American Legion & VFW 

Youth Day Loren Young, Chairman 

Governor's Day L. A. Ludens, Chairman 

Industrial Day C. W. Eberhardt, Chairman 

Agricultural Day ..— .- 

Old Times Day Eddie Schuler, Chairman 

HOSPITALITY DIVISION Don Mathew, Chairman 

Homecoming Committee Don Mathew, Chairman 

Housing Committee Warren Cant, Chairman 

Traffic Safety Committee Boyd Kimmel, Chairman 

Transportation Committee Robert C. Smith, Chairman 



THE MORRISON CENTENNIAL CORPORATION 



rr 



PROUDLY PRESENTS THE DRAMATIC SPECTACLE 

UPON THESE PRAIRIES 

A JOHN B. ROGERS PRODUCTION 
Directed by Alfred H. Srnka 

NARRATORS 

MRS. WILBUR D. MILLS — MRS. ALICE M. LESTER 
MISS ALBERTA JACKSON — MR. WM. BULL 
MR. ROBERT BULL — MR. L. C. ANDERSON 

CENTENNIAL CHORUS 

Direcled by Miss Nancy Nelson 

Belty Fredericks, Organist 

THE CAST 



^\ 



PROLOGUE 



Rene Siefken, Pamela Page, Jane Ludens, 



TRUMPETEERS — Cheryl Maurits, 
Dolores Nelson, Lonnia Gomez. 

STATES — Betty Tinkler, Sandra Bull, Karen McKee, Debbie Wilson, Linda 
Schuler, Susan Ramsay, Susan Beck, Barbara Bush, Mary Lynne Bracke- 
meyer. 

CADETS — Glenda Groharing, Carol Wagenecht, Ruth Schol, Donna Diephuis, 
Betty Shirk, Mary Lynn Klimstra, Diane Schroeder, Nancy Irion, Janice 
Stuart, Ruth Jennings, Carol Jensen, Karen Knox. 

RIDERS — Velma Rosenow, Joen Gallentine, Bill Hyer, Mrs. Bill Hyer, D. L. 
Wolber, Alice Wolber, Judy Spencer, Allan Howe, Howard Zuidema, Clare 
Meakins, Pauline Meakins, A. J. Large, B. B. Large, Lawrence Wolber, Mrs. 
Lawrence Wolber, Margy Haines, George Wolber, Shirley Wolber. 

GIRL SCOUTS — Sandra Sprengelmyer, Donna Zuidema, Gayle Horning, Vicki 
Onken, Nancy Sprague, Jane DeVries, Barbara Wood, Beverly Huizenga, 
Marjorie Ellis, Sharon Dykema, Kalhy Dykema, Janice Holland, Annette 
Butcher, Janet Hawthorne, Sally Jo Lenz, Gail Yacovetch. 

COLOR GUARD Sponsored by V. F. W. — E. H. Eads, Joe Klimson, D. W. Stralow, 
D. F. Stralow. 

MORRISON COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL BAND — Janice Aggen, Carolyn 
AUdritt, Carlton Anderson, James Andrews, Jeanne Brandt, Mary Buikema, 
Roger Buikema, Marilyn Burn, Lee Bush, David Carroll, Jere Chapin, Marilyn 
Conner, Maxieta Conrady, Lois Dale, Janet DeLoe, Charlene Duty, Donna 
Everist, Dorothy Fletchic, Joen Gallentine, John Genslinger, Barbara George, 
Rex Given, Donald Hagerty, Paul Hermes, Harvey Heusinkveld, Mary Heu- 
sinkveld, Sandy Hines, Phil Hook, Ronald Huizenga, Janet Irion, Velma 
Jansma, Virginia Johnson, Joan Matthew, Gordon Matthews, William Maurits, 
Kenneth Mills, Ronald Mills, Mary Lynn Neary, Joyce Ottens, Marlene Peter- 
son, Alva Pruis, Judy Renkes, Pat Renkes, Phil Renkes, Jeanne Rose, Dianne 
Rosenow, Nancy Shambaugh, Carolyn Schipper, Sonja Schroeder, Larry Sieh, 
Glenda, Simpson, Rita Stichter, Joyce Stralow, Donald Vandermyde, Douglas 
Vandermyde, Pat Waters, Eugene Watt, Janice Whistler, Sandy Witt, Allen 
Zuidema, Ethel Zuidema, Mary Ann Zuidema. 




&*i:& s^i^ Sf'iiSm ^2^ 2Sr. 

%%^ ^^^ ^1^ ^T^ 3^ 

_ m 
* # 

sk 

w 
w 



lill (1858-59) 



d in "Johnson's Hall" in 
of Main Street between 
ets. 

^DING — a four room 
1 1860 on Morris Street. 
L Kelly. 

— established in 1856. 
laster. 

AL FAIR in Whiteside 
)rrison in the fall of 1856 
Eul. 

MiU" at Unionville 1839; 
57 (% mile north), and 
landing) built in 1858-59. 

— the Sentinel whose 
/ 23, 1857. 

4G — held April 18, 1857, 
ry of Whiteside County, 
ison be incorporated as a 



USTEES — elected April 



-HT PLANT — Franchise 
1 Electric Light Company 
vember 1890 there were 
:50 merchant lights, 300 
street lights." 






PUBLIC 



SERVICE 



COMPANY 



1^ ^^^ 

SJC ^iT.^* ^TS* •ST!? ^.TjT "i^Ti^ ^'Ti^ ^t.«^ ^'^ *-?•* ^•''^ ^'T*^ ^T.** ^.T^ "T^ -sT.^ -'•7i* '^ 



ADMINISTRATIVE DP 
James H. JMcDi 

FINANCE DIVISION 

Underwriting Comni 
Novelties Committee 
Beard Contest Conini 
Historical Program i 
Official Hat Commi 
Concessions Commiti 
Decorations Commit 
Sisters of the Swish 

SPECTACLE TICKET L 

Advance Ticket Com 
Gate & Ushers Comn 
Queen Contest Comr 
Reserve Seat Commi 

PUBLICITY DIVISION 

Press Committee 
Radio Committee 
Promotional Commit 
Distributive Commit 
Speakers Committee 

SPECTACLE DIVISION 

Cast Committee . 
Costume & Make-Up 
Construction Commi 
Scenario & Title Con 
Properties Committei 
Spectacle Music Comi 

SPECIAL EVENTS DIVl 

Parade Committee . . 
Celebration Ball Con- 
Historical Window Ci 
Fireworks Committee 
Special Days Commit 

Religious Day 

Patriotic Day 

Youth Day 

Governor's Day 

Industrial Day 

Agricultural Day 

Old Times Day 



EPISODE ONE — "This is Morrison" Sponsored by P. E. O. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Mills, Jr. and John, Bruce and Howard. 

EPISODE TWO — "The Herilage of Freedom" American Legion and 

American Legion Auxiliary 
Bob Onken, Art Pyse, Dan Hook, Bill Snyder, Ray Siefken, Mrs. Ray 
Siefken, Sandy Hines, Merle Grau, Pat Renkes, Jimmy Siefken, David 
Siefken, Richard Carley, Eugene Elmendorf, Bernice Gronner, Bruce Gron- 
ner, Robert Johnson, Mrs. Dwaine Sikkema, Arlyn Sikkema, Brant Sikkema, 
Charlie Yost, Lloyd Yost, Richard Renkes, Meredith Renkes, Charles Riggen. 
Barbara Braden, Marsha Reed, Mary Ellen Reed, Patsy Wright, Mildred 
VanOosten, Clyde McDougall, Marjorie McDougall, Andrea McDougall, Adele 
McDougall, Marcia Maxfield, Vivian Tolbert, Donna Tolbert, Bud Dykema, 
Dan Richmond, Larry Sieh, Daniel W. Plumer. 

EPISODE THREE — "The New Frontier" Sponsored by Rural Youth, Farm 

Bureau, Home Bureau and Round Grove Grange 

Stanley Heller, Marian E. Heller, Gary Eugene Heller, Danny Lee Heller, 
Johnny Heller, Wayne Conrady, Lois Conredy, Don Hensler, Mae Hensler, 
Ann Hensler, Keith Hensler, Ernest W. Rosenow, Vada Rosenow, Lyle Doonan, 
Ruth Doonan, Dick Doonan, Donald Doonan, Nadine Doonan, Mildred 
Wells, Clyde Janvrin, Edward J. Wagenecht, Laura Wagenecht, Merle 
Durward, Lyle Nice, Lucille Nice, Marjorie Durward, Lucille Durward, 
Sandra Durward, Vivian Miller, Don Houseman, Dorothy Houseman, David 
Houseman, Kenneth Wiersenra, Arthur Rushmeyer, John Rushmeyer, Anthony 
Droste, Roy H. Velde, Marian J. Velde, Margaret Lewis, Viola Bielema, Leola 
Koester, Dorothy Sloot, Bob Cordes, Jacob Damhoff, Robert Carbaugh, Pat 
Wagenecht, Eddie Wagenecht. 

EPISODE FOUR — "An Early Marriage" Sponsored by Paschal Family 

Kenneth Paschal, Alan Pascha.l, Floyd Douglas, Vera Conrady, Bernita Forth, 
Alice Smaltz, Geraldine Peterson, Shirley Peterson, Dorothy Humphrey Bes- 
wick, Luella McDearmon, Zada Bruins, Eleanor J. Douglas, Lyle Paschal, 
Jean Paschal, Sara PaschsJ, Marsha Paschal, O. J. Humphrey, Mrs. O. J, 
Humphrey, W. N. Humphrey, R. J. Humphrey, Kenneth Beswick, Jane James, 
Dale J. Humphrey, Norman Bruins, Mrs. Lenora Jones, Mrs. Violetta Beswick, 
Donald Beswick, Karen Beswick, Ann Groharing, Susan Groharing, B. G. 
Humphrey. 

EPISODE FIVE — "Remember the Sabbaih" Sponsored by Rural Youth, 

Farm Bureau, Home Bureau and Round Grove Grange 

Stanley Heller, Marian E. Heller, Gary Eugene Heller, Danny Lee Heller, 
Johnny Heller, Wayne Conrady, Lois Conrady, Don Hensler, Mae Hensler, 
Anne Hensler, Keith Hensler, Ernest W. Rosenow, Vada Rosenow, Lyle 
Doonan, Ruth Doonan, Dick Doonan, Donald Doonan, Nadine Doonan, Mildred 
Wells, Clyde Janvrin, Edward J. Wagenecht, Laura Wagenecht, Merle Dur- 
ward, Lyle Nice, Lucille Nice, Marjorie Durward, Lucille Durward, 
Sandra Durward, Vivian Miller, Don Houseman, Dorothy Houseman, David 
Houseman, Kenneth Wiersema, Arthur Rushmeyer, John Rushmeyer, Anthony 
Droste, Roy H. Velde, Marian J. Velde, Margaret Lewis, Viola Bielema, Leola 
Koester, Dorothy Sloot, Bob Cordes, Jacob Damhoff, Robert Caxbaugh, Pat 
Wagenecht, Eddie Wagenecht, Clair Pickens, Albert J. Crump, Henry Radatz, 
Edna Radatz, Marie Conner, Ralph Conner, Edna VenHuizen, Isaac Ven- 
Huizen, Rachel Rick. 

EPISODE SIX — "The Dawn of Education" Sponsored by P. T. A. 

Jim DeVries, Bobby Hammer, Alan Stone, Trudy Huizenga, Judy Aggen, 
Melinda Popkins, Mary Jane Knox, Stephen Liehr, Jayne Pape, Don Ellin- 
wood, Denise Rick, Nola Hunter, Richy Tyler, J. D. Wylder, Gilbert Chapin. 



HOSPITALITY DIVISION ._ .Don Mathew, Chairman 

Homecoming Committee .- Don Mathew, Chairman 

Housing Committee Warren Cant, Chairman 

Traffic Safety Committee ._.. Boyd Kimmel, Chairman 

Transportation Committee Robert C. Smith, Chairman 



EPISODE SEVEN — "Just One Hundred Years Ago" Sponsored by Rotary Club 

Art Goodenough, Roland Kamm, Ralph Kelzle, Leo M. Knox, W. J. Potter, 
J. A. Marshall, S. F. Long, Robert T. McMaster, Robert W. McMast^r, Clarence 
Ardapple, L. A. Ludens, John Ludens. 

EPISODE EIGHT — "The Coming of the Iron Horse" Sponsored by Lions and 

Lioness Clubs 

Harry Traum, Gay Wotring, Eddie Wotring, Ward Moulton, Dorothy Moul- 
ton, Mrs. K. O. Miller, K. O. Miller, Richard Langley, Dorothy Langley, Susan 
Langley, Earl V. Anderson, Francis H. Worcester, Evelyn Worcester, James 
Worcester, Peter Worcester, Frances Humphrey, Wilma Blumsnstein, C. J. 
Blumenslein, Mrs. John Evans, J. D. Evans, John Slonneger. 

EPISODE NINE — "Unionville Riled Over Railroad" Sponsored by Art Guild 

Richard T. Rideout, W. J. Maurits, Carl Hammer, Charles Stoodley. 



EPISODE TEN 



"Morrison, The County Seat" 



Sponsored by Lions and 
Lioness Clubs 



Harry Tra.um, Gay Wotring, Eddie Wotring, Ward Moulton, Dorothy Moul- 
ton, Mrs. K. O. Miller, K. O. Miller, Richard Langley, Dorothy Langley, Susan 
Langley, Earl V. Andersen, Francis H. Worcester, Evelyn Worcester, James 
Worcester, Peter Worcester, Frances Humphrey, Wilma Blumenstein, C. J. 
Blumenstein, Mrs. John Evans, J. D. Evans, John Slonneger, Frank Westen- 
dorf, Mary Westendorf, Dr. E. R. Smith, Mrs. E. R. Smith, Gail Schipper, 
Georgia Liehr, Carolyn Liehr, Allan Beardslee, Sara Beardslee, Gary Beards- 
lee, Clayton, Sprague, Lenora Sprague. 



EPISODE ELEVEN — "The Gold Rush" Sponsored by Odd Fellows 

Nara Hunter, George Hunter, A. A. James, Mrs. George C. Dykema, George 
C. Dykema, Merlin J. Gross, Elmer S. Entwhistle. 



EPISODE TWELVE — "The War Between The States" Sponsored by League of 

Women Voters 

Merle Edlund, Jim Page, Bill Green, Tom Kelly, Don Vandermyde, Dick 
Cassens, Robert Maedge, Lloyd E. Null, Jim Aggen, Clare Chapin, Lucille 
Chapin, Bonnie Bush, Jim Bull, Sue Denny, John Lee, Dorothy Mudge, Cloc 
Leunig, Mrs. Lloyd E. Null. 



EPISODE THIRTEEN — "Bikes, Bustles and Mustaches" Sponsored by Women's 
Club, Wa-Tan-Ye, Household Science Club, Shrine, Masons and 

Eastern Star 

Kristen Edlund, Howell S. Gerhard, Dorothy E. Gerhard, Nerys Gerhard, 
Gary Gerhard, C. W. George, June Haan, Emily Rick, Donna Bodkin, Faye 
Norman, A. L. Benedict, Jr., Garrett Sikkema, Alta Sikkema., Howard Wright, 
Dillwyn McKee, Arthur Burch, Clyde Toppert, Reuben Garwick, Gladys Gar- 
wick, Maude McKee, Betty Toppert, Myrtle Burch, George Curtis, Alice 
Curtis, Frank VanOsdol, Marguerite VanOsdol, Barbara Page, June Gustafson, 
Phyllis D. Fell, Virginia Beck, Debbie Beck, Virginia Ra.stede, Jean Slavin 
Lawrence Hawthorne, Terry Holt, Dorothy Holt, Irene Hawthorne, EUyn 
Renkes, Donna Everist, Janice Aggen, Joyce Stralow, Janet Irion, Peggy 
Baxter, Connie Conrady, Nancy Huggins, Marienne Ketzle, Diane Rosenow, 
Eugene Wiersema, Alice Wiersema, Doug Wiersema, Carole Browne. 



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VfUl (1858-59) 



Id in "Johnson's Hall" in 
of Main Street between 
Jets. 

LDING — a four room 
n 1860 on Morris Street. 
I. Kelly. 

; — established in 1856. 
naster. 

.AL FAIR in Whiteside 
)rrison in the faU of 1856 
Eul. 

' MiU" at UnionviUe 1839; 
157 (% mile north), and 
tanding) biult in 1858-59. 

— the Sentinel whose 
/ 23, 1857. 

iG — held April 18, 1857, 
ry of Whiteside County, 
ison be incorporated as a 



USTEES — elected AprU 



,HT PLANT — Franchise 
1 Electric Light Company 
vember 1890 there were 
150 merchant lights, 300 
street lights." 




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ADMINISTRATIVE DI> 
James H. McDi 

FINANCE DIVISION 
Underwriting Conim 
Novelties Committee 
Beard Contest Comm 
Historical Program < 
Official Hat Commi 
Concessions Commit! 
Decorations Commit 
Sisters of the Swish i 



EPISODE FOURTEEN — "The Battle For Freedom" . . Sponsored by GEM and 

GEAA Clubs 
Stanley Maxfield, Phil G. Haendler, H. Ben EUicolt, John B. Planthaber, Hank 
DeGroot, Arnold Siefken, James Jerome, Shirley Hulsebreg, Beulah Fletchic, 
Doris Planthaber, Mary Jo Sechrist, Lorraine Wagenecht, Edna Duty, Marion 
Schultz, Erma Scharfenberg, Jerry Bogle, Roger M. Brady, Wm. E. Brady, 
Mary L. Stralow. 

EPISODE THIRTEEN — "The Roarin' Twenties" Sponsored by High School 

Drama Club 
Karen Edlund, Carlton Anderson, Virginia Akker, Jim Maxey, Bob Onken, 
Dan Richmond, Merle Grau, Bill Snyder, Larry Sieh, Sigrid Jensen, Patsy 
Wright, Pat Renkes, Sandy Hines, Janice Aggen. 

EPISODE SIXTEEN — "Seige for Freedom" Sponsored by V. F. W. a,nd 

V. F. W. Auxiliary 
Clarence Stralow, Lester Bull, Robert Vigen, Paul Sprengelmeyer, Richard 
Williams, Russell T. Lenz, Jo Anne H. Lenz, Sally Jo Lenz, Shelby Anne 
Lenz, Joseph W. Lenz, Cinda Lou Lenz. 



SPECTACLE TICKET E 

Advance Ticket Com 
Gate & Ushers Comii 
Queen Contest Comn 
Reserve Seat Commi 

PUBLICITY DIVISION 

Press Committee 

Radio Committee --. 
Promotional Commit 
Distributive Commit 
Speakers Committee 

SPECTACLE DIVISION 

Cast Committee 

Costume & Make-Up 
Construction Commi 
Scenario & Title Con 
Properties Committe 
Spectacle Music Com 

SPECIAL EVENTS DIV: 

Parade Committee 
Celebration Ball Cor 
Historical Window C 
Fireworks CommittC' 
Special Days Commil 

Religious Day 

Patriotic Day 

Youth Day -- 

Governor's Day 

Industrial Day 

Agricultural Day 

Old Times Day 



EPISODE SEVENTEEN — "The Morrison Hall of Fame" . Sponsored by 

Citizens who gained fame 
Roy A. McKinney, Joe A. Gorzney. 

EPISODE EIGHTEEN — "The Atomic Age" 

FINALE — The entire cast. 

CENTENNIAL CHORUS — Jay Huitsing, Burnell Doden, Virginia Siefken, Pat 
Dykema, Neale Fadden, Don Fadden, Robert M. Dykema, Robert Aiken, John 
Boland, Donald Miller, Gail Austin, Barbara Austin, J. A. Gorzney, Nancy 
Heun, Louella Gorzney, Sadie Huizenga, AUene VanDyke, Dave Mathew, 
Louise Mathew, Chris Watson, Virginia, Schuler, Annetta Rich, Betty Frede- 
rick, Marilyn Aggen, Doris Swehla, Kathryn Pittenger, Nancy Yost, Diki 
Bull, Bill Bull, Bill Rastede, Nancy Nelson, Bev Schuler, C. Austin, Jeanne 
Weaver, 



THANKS 



To Burton Shambaugh and the carpenters who donated their time to build 
the set. 

To Bob Yarbrough, Al Zuidema and electricians for wiring the set. 

To Bob Bull and Doris Butcher and properties committee for their assistance 
in gathering props. 

To Gladys Smith and Gladys Ludens for their aid on costumes and make-up 
committees. 

Mrs. Alene Haines for preparing the material for the script. 

Miss Wilma, Lucas and Miss Alberta Jackson for getting the cast together. 

To the Board of Education for using the facilities at the High School. 

And to all the people of Morrison who helped make this Centennial Cele- 
bration a success. 

And special thanks to the cast of "Upon These Prairies." 

Les Janke, Spectacle Chairman 
Al Srnka, Director 



HOSPITALITY DIVISION Don Mathew, Chairman 

Homecoming Committee -- Don Mathew, Chairman 

Housing Committee ----- ...Warren Cant, Chairman 

Traffic Safety Committee Boyd Kimmel, Chairman 

Transportation Committee Robert C. Smith, Chairman 






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EARLY 

MORRISON 

FIRSTS 



FIRST SETTLERS — John W. 

Stakes, who broke eight acres of 
land on the site of Morrison in 
1836; Lyman Johnson; Henry 
Vroom; Homer Caswell; John J. 
West; James Snyder; N. M. Jackson; 
W. H. Van Epps. 



FIRST BUILDING — Combination home and 
rooming house built in 1854 by Lyman Johnson, 
later to be enlarged and used as a hotel called 
"Morrison House". It was located on the N.E. 
corner of Base and Main. 

FIRST RESIDENCE — Built by H. S. Vroom in 
1854 on the S.W. comer of Base and Lincolnway. 

FIRST RAILROAD — the 

Air Line Railroad built by 
Chicago & North Western 
through Morrison to the 
J Mississippi River in 1855. 
First train arrived in Mor- 
rison October 19, 1855, under the charge of Mr. 
John Furlong. 




FIRST CHURCH BUILDING — 

Church built of bricks in 1856. 



the Baptist 



FIRST RELIGIOUS GROUP — the Methodists 
who held services in the cabin of W. H. Paschal 
1339. 

FIRST STORE — Henry Ustick's "General Store" 
erected in 1855. 

FIRST BUSINESS — H. McCrea and Company's 
elevator built in 1855 on the S.W. corner of Mar- 
ket and Genesee Streets. 




Unionville Mill (1858-59) 



FIRST SCHOOL — Held in "Johnson's Hall" in 
1858 on the North side of Main Street between 
Genesee and Base Streets. 

FIRST SCHOOL BUILDING — a four room 
brick structure built in 1860 on Morris Street. 
Its first teacher - M. R. Kelly. 

FIRST POST OFFICE — established in 1856. 
John E. Bennett Postmaster. 

FIRST AGRICULTURAL FAIR in Whiteside 
County was held at Morrison in the fall of 1856 
and was quite successful. 

FIRST MILLS — "Saw MiU" at Unionville 1839; 
Jacobstown Mill in 1857 (% mile north), and 
Unionville Mill (still standing) built in 1858-59. 

FIRST NEWSPAPER — the Sentinel whose 
first issue is dated July 23, 1857. 

FIRST TOWN MEETING — held April 18, 1857, 
according to the History of Whiteside County. 
It was voted that Morrison be incorporated as a 
town. 

FIRST BOARD OF TRUSTEES — elected April 
25, 1857. 

FIRST ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT — Franchise 
granted to the Morrison Electric Light Comp2iny 
in April 1890. By November 1890 there were 
in use in Morrison "450 merchant lights, 300 
resident lights and 86 street lights." 



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COMPANY 



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-SMITH' 

Trust and SavinOs 

AlORM SOiV- I LLI ATOI S 



A Banking Institution 

Operated 

In The Interests Of 

Its Community 



Since 1879 



OFFICERS 



MASON BULL 
W. J. POTTER 
E. A. SMITH 



A. M. POTTER 
R. M. WYLDER 
M. L. RITCHIE 



EMPLOYEES 

Rachel Groharing 
Mary Miller 
Cornelia Drolema 
Jean DeVriea 
Betty Ottens 
Patricia Dykema 
Susanne Stralow 
C. C. Cowan 



OFFICERS 

E. A. SMITH, President 

R. M. WYLDER, Executive Vice-President 
and Tnist Officer 

W. J. POTTER, Vice-President 
and Tnist Officer 

B. W. PAGE, Vice-President 
and Trust Officer 

ROY A. McKINNEY, Cashier 

H. L. REBTVELD, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. GEORGE, Assistant Cashier